Reno: Chronic Pain, Chronic Illness, Chronic Injuries: Osteopathic Medicine

Osteopathic Medicine:

Chronic Pain, Chronic Injuries, Natural Pain Management, Regeneration & Restoration (people, animals & environments) 

Chronic Illness (autoimmune, inflammation, cancer, chemically sensitive, fungus), Before & After Surgery Care, Recovery, Education

Nutrition, Diet, Food as Medicine, Supplements Support, Private & Classes (people, animals & environments) 

Herbal Medicine (people, animals & environments), Handcrafted Herbal Medicines (external & Internal)

Structural Acupuncture & Acupressure, Articular Acupressure, AUP, Energy Healing Medicine, Vibrational Medicine, Medical Intuitive (People, animals & environments)

Helping My clients to become self-reliant for their own health, well being and the world around them. Leave harmful medicines and approaches behind. 

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What you can Expect with an Osteopathic Session

Consulting~Lifestyle, Supplement & Diet Coaching~Hands-on Sessions~Spot Treatments~Acupressure & Acupunture~Herbal Medicine Products~Vibrational Medicine

 

Hands-on: in-person sessions Reno, Nevada, Surround Area

Online Sessions on Zoom

Traveling to Locations USA

All Sessions are by Appointment. First Session is an online Assessment session.

Session Costs: 40 minute $80.00 USD/ 80 minute sessions are $155.00 USD/Online Only $125.00 USD 80 minute session

The cost of specific travel to locations is different than the prices listed here.

Client Testimonials

Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff is a Traditional Osteopath with almost 30 years of experience and continued education. She specializes in Structural & Energy Medicine, Nutrition, and Herbalism. Bridgette is also an international registered Medical Intuitive. She attended Rudolph Steiner College to learn Biodynamics, Spiritual Sciences, Anthroposophic Medicine, and apprentice on farms, as well as permaculture, stays. Bridgette works with and on humans, animals, and the environment/s in person and online. In the past Bridgette spent summers in different locations across the USA doing soil restoration, land regeneration and small to large farm build educating as she works with the landowners. She is also a lifetime practitioner of Shamanism and comes from bloodlines of a shaman, medicine people, herbalists, healers, clairvoyants, prophets, and exorcists. Bridgette understands that real medicine and nutrition start with recovering and restoring the soil, these processes will also heal the land, the air, the water, the people, and all beings living on Earth. The second half of her life is spent healing the earth and educating those who are interested. Bridgette teaches classes in person and online in shamanism, seeds, beings, forces, soil, animal health, people health, animal health, environmental health, nutrition, pain management, and more. 

Check out my YouTube Channel for many more videos that go back to 2008 covering farming, food, diet, animal & people health and healing, medicine, and more: https://www.youtube.com/user/bridgenit

Sessions can be paid for in numerous ways: cryptocurrencies, silver, gold, USD, PayPal. I can also create invoices for businesses for tax purposes.

I do not take insurance of any kind, nor do I help with any insurance claims of any kind. 

 

Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff Contact:   

consciousnessnessofeconomics@gmail.com                                            skype: bridgneit                         https://www.facebook.com/bridgette.lyn.dolgoff

Reno: Holistic Animal Healthcare, Biodynamics, Nutrition, Herbalism: Urban Farm Project

Reno: Medical Intuitive, Energy Healing, Shamanism Tools: Vibrational Medicine

http://www.freedomslips.com/host_html/Carrying-Stones-And-Digging-Holes-To-Cultivate-Consciousness.html

 

Special Visitor

I woke up today and this was looking right at me. I feel so blessed to have a special visit, special attention from this grand being.

I am calling this being the Crystalline Octopus Light Being. Whenever beings visit me like this I know I am loved, being watched over, cared for.

In the last few days, I have been asking for energy, the power to get through some changes. My message seems to have been heard and that energy is being sent directly to me.

This being was on the wall, it was so unique and gorgeous.

Enjoy the Light….

Breaking the Chains of Conditioning

Putting choiceless awareness into practice requires that we not tune out our experience of attraction and aversion but tune them in even more deeply. Yogis discovered that if we can learn to train our awareness enough to acknowledge sensations as they arise, to experience them fully, and to bear them, then we can no longer be bound to the wheel of opposites. We are no longer whipped around by our conditioned responses to pleasure and pain. We can no longer be compelled to act unconsciously on the sensations.

Desire is not the problem. Attraction is not the problem. Aversion is not the problem. The problem is learning to live with the bare reality of the phenomenal world. The skillful means used in the yogic practice to explore this bare reality is called afflictions in the yogic view, witness consciousness is the primary skillful means for freeing us from our bondage to them. These are the six primary characteristics of the witness.

  • The witness does not choose for or against any aspect of reality. The witness does not split life into good or bad, right or wrong, high and low, or spiritual and not spiritual. The witness does not take the sides but experiences a kind of choiceless awareness.
  • The witness does not censor life. The witness allows all thoughts, feelings, and sensations to receive the light of awareness, without discriminating. There is absolutely nothing that the witness cannot see, feel, and experience. There is no shadow, no shame, no repression that is not capable of being penetrated by witnessing. The witness is not judgemental in any way, but practical self-observation without judgment.
  • Witnessing is a whole-body experience. Witnessing is not an intellectual exercise. Quite to the contrary. We actually witness our experience with the whole body, allowing ourselves to feel the reverberations of the sensations throughout the whole physical emotional organism. Indeed, when the witness is finely honed, we can sometimes feel the reverberation of experience throughout all of the five sheaths.
  • Witness consciousness is always present at least in its potential form in every human being at every moment. The witness is the essence of the divine, awake, already enlightened nature. We don’t have to create the witness. This quality of consciousness needs only to be recognized, evoked, claimes, and cultivated.
  • The witness is the part of the already awake mind that is capable of standing completely still, even in the center of the whirlwind of sensations, thoughts, feelings, fantasies- even in serious mental and physical illness. From the witness, we can stand back and objectively observe our experience even as we’re having that experience. Even as the witness stands as the still point at the center of the storm, though, this part of our consciousness can fully dance with life, directly experiencing all sensation, even as it remains completely still, anchored and grounded.
  • The witness goes everywhere. The witness is connected to the whole quantum field of mind and matter. Witness consciousness stands outside time and space, living in the eternal now of the unmanifest realms, while also penetrating time and space. Witness consciousness is the quality of the self-aware universe. It is the intelligence, the “sight without a seer”, that saturates the whole quantum field of mind and matter.

The Five Koshas

As we begin to explore the koshas below, you’ll notice that they map out an inward journey, from the periphery of the body and arriving at the very essence of who you are.

1. Physical Body

We begin at the outermost layer, the physical body (organs, bones, muscle tissue, and skin), known as the annamaya kosha in yoga. Anna means “food” or “physical matter” and maya means “made of.” We are the most familiar with our annamaya kosha—the experience of our physical body in yoga.

2. Energy Body

Sheathed by the physical layer, the energetic body is called the pranamaya kosha and is composed of the body’s subtle life-force energy prana, also known as chi in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

The animating force behind every atom, cell, organ, and body system, prana coordinates every physiological activity, from the pumping of the heart to the elimination of waste.

Imbalances or blocks within this energetic body greatly affect the overall function of the physical body. What’s more, the body’s subtle energy greatly influences the state of the mind, which is the next layer of self. Prana is closely related to the breath—you receive prana upon the air you breathe.

When the breath is shallow and sporadic, your prana is also erratic. Unstable pranic energy causes the mind to become agitated and the body’s various systems irregular. Smooth out the breath, and prana becomes more stable, the mind gets calmer, and all the body’s living systems function more optimally.

If you’re interested in working with your vital energy, yogic breathing practices known as pranayama exercises, increase and regulate prana in the body.

3. Mental Body

The third layer corresponds to your mind, emotions, and nervous system—expressed as streams of thoughts, feelings, and sensations, and is known as the manomaya kosha, from manas, which means “mind” or “thought processes.”

Many of us have an overactive manomaya kosha that wears on our nervous system and plays out through our emotions. Yoga helps calm our minds and soothe our nervous systems, allowing you to recover from the effects of stress and fatigue on your third body.

Your mental body is also where we experience the five senses. It’s the sheath that allows us to receive, absorb, and process input from the world around us, governing our automatic responses and reflexes. When you go on autopilot and zone out, you’re operating from your manomaya kosha.

4. Wisdom Body

You begin working with the first three bodies as soon as you start practicing yoga.

Coordinating your breath with your movement brings you present on your mat—synchronizing your physical, energetic, and mental bodies. However, the next layer, your wisdom body, takes a little more internal awareness that is cultivated over time.

Beneath the constant stream of thoughts, feelings, and sensations (the processing, thinking, and reactive mind), lies an inner knowing and higher intelligence in your wisdom body, which is called the vijnanamaya kosha, from vijnana, or “intellect.”

Your intuition, conscience, and the reflective aspects of your consciousness are all part of your wisdom body. Here, we develop our awareness and deeper insight into the nature of who we are and how we relate to the world around us.

The practice of yoga helps quiet the mental body so that our wisdom body can be heard and begin to guide us. One simple way to start working with your vijnanamaya kosha is to simply pay attention to any sensations or pulsations taking place internally throughout your practice.

For example, after a Bridge Pose or backbend, once you’re back down on your mat, close your eyes, feel the sensations taking place on the inside, and become aware of your heartbeat.

5. Bliss Body

The deepest layer of our being is the core of our existence, known as the anandamaya kosha, from ananda, which means “bliss.” Often referred to as your highest self or spirit, your bliss body is where you experience the unbounded freedom, expanse, and joyousness of your true nature.

Connection with this kosha is like coming home. There’s a sense of peace and connectedness during which time ceases to exist and your consciousness expands beyond the limits of your body.

While most people aren’t even aware of this aspect of their being, chances are you’ve experienced glimpses of your anandamaya kosha throughout your life.

Holding your newborn child or looking into your lover’s eyes, you may have dropped from conscious awareness and into your radiant bliss body. You might have also touched upon it while losing yourself in a painting, poem, film, story, or song, or perhaps while giving a speech or performance.

I dip in and out of my bliss body when I’m teaching yoga. Without having to involve my thinking mind, wisdom, directions, and insights pour out of me and fifteen minutes can go by in the blink of an eye.

 

 

Yogi’s Discovered a Third Way

Yogis discovered a third way, a path that does not split the world into two pain and pleasure, right and wrong, good and bad, sacred and profane. They discovered a path that does not require us to suppress the energy of desire, but allows, us to fully experience it. Patanjali writes of his third way as the development of a kind of “impartially in the spheres of pleasure and pain, virtue and vice.”

The fifteenth-century scripture called Vedantasara The Essence of the Doctrines of Vedanta describes the practice of titiksa, a cultivation of an attitude of impartiality, patients, and endurance towards the pairs of opposites, a practice this scripture honors as one of the six treasures of life.

This impartiality and neutrality towards polarities referred to by some modern yogis, as choiceless awareness. Choiceless awareness is the third way because when we are practicing it, we do not push away any sensation. We do not believe the pairs of opposites can be separated. Rather, we develop our capacity to experience the way things are, to live each moment fully, to receive the whole light and sounds show.

In a sense, we do not choose against any experience, we choose for all of it.

A Flight from Clear SEEING & its IMPLICATIONS

We will see that in order to get our basic needs to take care of as a child, we had to learn precisely how much not to see certain aspects of reality, we commit to not seeing the truth as a way of coping.

Many spiritual seekers participate to some degree in this strategy. Much of a spiritual practice then becomes, in fact, a flight from clear seeing and its implications. Harvard psychologist Jack Engler gives us a very helpful list of some of the ways in which AVOIDANCE of the real can motivate our so-called spiritual paths. For some of us, spirituality can be unconsciously driven by:

  • A quest for perfection and invulnerability. We may feel especially prone to the quest for perfection if we feel all too imperfect, or if we have been badly hurt and don’t want to ever have to feel that vulnerable again.
  • A fear of Individuation. We may be anxious about stepping out into the world, assuming responsibility for ourselves and our life, shrinking back from competition, comparisons, or achievement.
  • Avoidance of Commitment and Accountability. We might conveniently relabel this avoidance spiritual “detachment” or, in New Age terminology, “just going with the flow”.
  • A Fear of Intimacy and Social Involvement. It’s striking how many of us drawn to spiritual life have a history of difficulties with intimacy and closeness in relationships, or disappointments in love, and how being in a spiritual community allows us to feel a sense of belonging without resolving these underlying fears.
  • An Inability to Grieve and Mourn Important Losses. All the spiritual teachings and practices about “letting go”, “renunciation” or “detachment” can actually substitute for a genuine facing of personal grief and loss, and the painful feelings associated with it.
  • An Avoidance of Feelings. So many drawn to spiritual practice have difficulty with strong emotions like anger, sadness, and disappointment. Spiritual traditions label these as kleshas and as unwholesome, and so we may take this to mean we shouldn’t feel them, and then we feel guilty or unspiritual if we do. Sometimes the experience of pleasure and sexuality seems to be even more problematic for the people drawn to spiritual practice.

We Fall Down

We fall down and down, until we touch the ground, until we relate with the basic sanity of the earth.

We become the lowest of the low, the smallest of the small, a grain of sand, perfectly simple, no exceptions….

If you are a grain of sand, the rest of the universe, all the space. all the room is yours, because you obstruct nothing, overcrowd nothing, possess nothing.

There is tremendous openness.

You are the emperor of the universe because you are a grain of sand.

Chogyam Trungpa, Rinpoche

Yoga Means

Yoga means that now there is no hope, now there is no future, now there is are no desires. One is ready to know what is. One is not interested in what can be, what should be, what ought to be. One is not interested! One is interested only in that which is because only the real can free you, only the reality can become liberation.

Total despair is needed. That despair is called dukkha by Buddha. And if you are really in misery, don’t hope, because your hope will only prolong the misery. Your hope is a drug. It can help you to reach death only nowhere else. All your hopes can lead you only to death.

Become totally hopeless, no future, no hope. Difficult. Needs courage to face the real. But such a moment comes to everyone some time or another. A moment comes to every human being when he feels total hopelessness. Absolute meaninglessness happens to him. When he becomes aware that whatsoever he is doing is useless, wheresoever he is going, he is going nowhere, all his life is meaningless, suddenly hopes drop, future drops, and for the time you are face to face with the reality… When you are not moving into the future, not moving toward the past then you start moving within yourself, because your being is is here and now. You are present here and now. You can enter this reality.

Bhagwan S. Rajneesh his comments on the Yogasutras

In Addition To…

End Suffering

In addition to the mind, body, and personality, yoga teaches that the true home of the soul is also beyond time and space, in the external now of consciousness. When we live disconnected from the vast roots of the Self, We suffer. Self is capitalized here because it refers to the divine, awake, free self. Giving the yogic view of our predicament, it’s not surprising that we are often so estranged, that we feel unreal, that we feel disconnected from our center. That is precisely our condition.

The classical “scriptures” identify five “afflictions” or kleshas, five conditioned beliefs and behaviors that keep us bound to ” gross apparent reality.” They are:

Ignorance, I-ness, Attraction, Aversion, Clinging to life, and fear of death.

Ignorance is the ground from which all other afflictions spring. Out of Ignorance arises I-ness the belief in and clinging to a separate, solid, “small s” self. Out of the I-ness arise attraction and aversion, our complete identification with our likes and dislikes. And out of this inevitably arises clinging to life and fear of death, a deluded and desperate desire for life to be small, neat, permanent, and solid rather than vast, incomprehensible, impermanent, and discontinuous as it really is.

In addition to the five afflictions, the scriptures also identify four erroneous beliefs that sustain the delusion of the kleshas. These are:

The belief in the permanence of objects, The belief in the ultimate reality of the body, The belief that our state of suffering IS REALLY HAPPINESS, and The belief that our bodies, minds, and feelings are our true selves.

 

 

On His Final Night of Enlighten’ment

On the night of his final enlightenment, even the Buddha had to call on the power of the Earth goddess, the divine Shakti, for help with the forces of Mara/s, the dark powers of delusion. Buddha touched the ground where he sat. “This Earth,” he said, “is my witness.” This statement could be taken further: this Earth is my family member, my sister, myself. 

Demonic Forces: The Four Maras

  • To make one ecstatic (dga’-byed)
  • To make one crave (sred-byed)
  • To make one stupefied (rmongs-byed), which perhaps suggests making one spaced out or senile
  • To make one thin, emaciated and dried out (skem-byed), which, in this context, could mean worn out, hungry, and thirsty, so that one gives up meditation. In other contexts, perhaps it is the work of Mara that we become dried out and have no moisture of compassion.
  • To make one dead (‘chi-byed), which, in this context, could perhaps make Shiva worry that he will die while meditating, so being afraid of that, he would get up.

https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/lam-rim/samsara-nirvana/demonic-forces-the-four-maras