“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”

Gardening with Jannie Vaught

There is a saying “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” and never is it truer than in natures garden. Some like ordered rows and clear lines of plants and some prefer natures tumble of flowers native grasses and low growing ground cover. And some of us like a little of both. Summer has stepped its hot dry foot right in the middle of a spectacular spring. The marginal garden veggies are fading, the wild places are looking a little dry and it’s just how it is this year. When you stand still and take a deep long look you will see that the Native to Texas plants, grasses and trees are hanging in there, patient and true waiting for the rain and cooler temperatures to arrive. While many of the non-natives and even adapted pants trees and grasses are suffering. This is a good case for designing with the plants that are true to this specific growing area. Let’s look at the native persimmon. Diospyros Texana is a species of persimmon that is native to central, south and west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern and northeastern Mexico. Common name includes Texas persimmon, Mexican persimmon and more ambiguous “Black persimmon”. Multi-trunked, small tree or large shrub. A lifespan of 30 to 50 years. Usually grows 9 ft and some reaching 12 ft in ideal locations, (that means regular water). The bark is smooth and a light reddish grey and peels away from the mature to reveal pink white and grey. The leaves are ovate and dark green, the upper leaves are glossy while the lower leaves have fine hairs. They are male or female and will girls will flower from March to April, they are white and urn shape. The fruits are black and ripen in August. Here is some information I find interesting, the sapwood is of a yellow color while the “Heartwood”, found only in older larger trees is black(ebony) in color, it is hard and takes a high polish. Used to make engraving blocks, artwork and tools. The fleshy berries are edible and very sweet when ripe. Relished by birds humans and mammals throughout time. Traditionally used by Native American to make a black dye for hides and are still used in Mexico today. Of course being a native they are drought resistant. They are a larval host for the Grey streak butterfly. They are propagated from seed. After they are fully ripe, clean the seed of any fruit immediately, dry and store in a tight refrigerated container.  Lighty scar or nick the outer shell and plant in a small pot using potting soil in spring. They are also available from local nursery’s. This is truly a Texas history plant, everyone has a story about this persimmon, as you design a native garden don’t forget the native persimmon as the second story tree, shrub. They can be pruned into lovely sculpted designs and add that something extra to your garden. Plus you get fruit to make a delicious pudding or sauce, provide food for the bird’s bees and butterflies or any hungry critter looking for a tasty meal. We want all of Texas creatures to have something to eat. And this is where the quote from the beginning of this holds true. “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”. Especially when you take a moment and consider the Native persimmon. Growing green Jannie

Who’s your Farmer?

Gardening with Jannie Vaught

Who’s your farmer? I for one know where my produce comes from. My very own garden. At one time I knew who grew my food, raised my beef and milked the cow I raised my children on. Now we are very far away from this simple lifestyle and all the goodness it brought with it. We are fed from monster farms who mass produce one crop, no diversity, and raise our food in un-natural feed lot’s. And now we are in the deepest drought we can ever imagine with these farms laying fallow. Maybe it’s time to get down to the basics of feeding ourselves again. There is a large movement across this country, it is referred to in several ways. Garden to the plate, Gate to the plate ( ranching and dairy), Orchard to plate fruit, nut’s, berries. Pasture raised and free range, the list can go on for a long time. The drive behind this movement is our realizing we are not being an active participant in this crucial part of our healthy life. At one time the small farmer and rancher was the real breadbasket of America. Big corporations ground them down to nothing, paying penny’s on the dollar for their places and turned them into corporate disasters. Hard words? Yes! We are in a serious situation with this continuing drought. Calif is gone, this state produced 85% of the nation’s food. The cost for a bag of groceries is nothing I ever would have believed just a few years ago. Now we are faced with not just high prices but the possibility of not enough food for everyone, not to mention the people who are already struggling with feeding their family’s. I came across an old advertisement from the day’s after WWII, when the Victory garden and small farm was promoted by the Government. The people saw the need, they were hungry and everyone literally, dug in. Are we so far removed that we can’t see the writing on the wall, or the empty cabinet, to realize it is time for us to again dig in. Returning to this simple life of again growing even as a supplemental to our food needs. Buying from local growers, ranchers, and orchards the local fruits of the field. After all the Earth belongs to us all. We are not part of some foreign place this is our home and we should care and be in gratitude for the rich soil and our river right in our own front yard. There is a story I would like to share with you. The story of the hummingbird. “There was a serious fire in the lush forest jungle. All the animals ran in fear and cowered in one place. “What shall we do? We will surely perish.” But there was one hummingbird who believed there was something she could do, so she flew to the creek and took as much water as she could carry in her tiny beak. She flew back to the fire and released her drop of water on the fire, again and again, she flew. The other animals saw her working and they too realized they could carry water and put it on the fire also. So they all worked running back and forth one drop at a time and put the fire out!
The care of one small drop of water can change the outcome of our current situation. One small garden can feed you, another can feed your neighbor and many, well that’s when we get sustainable again. Always know you are cared for and not alone, sometimes we have to pick up our shovel’s and Dig IN!  Just growing green!!!  Jannie

Just when your Garden is Struggling

Gardening with Jannie Vaught

Just when your garden is struggling and your enthusiasm is at an all-time low, something or someone steps into your path and shares with you something that sets that spark alight. This happened this Saturday at our LLano farmers market. Elizabeth Mcmahon “Beth” horticulture county extension agent for Gilespie county, regularly comes to Llano farmers market and has her lovely produce for sale. This Saturday she had potatoes. And not any old potatoes, there were 4 “new to this gardener” varieties available. Purple Viking potato, truly a beautiful purple with lighter colors mottled and swirled. To salon pink. They are creamy white sweet and buttery. All-purpose potato with long shelf life and are scab and somewhat leafhopper resistant. Next, she pulled out Harlequin Gold a new variety that is heat tolerant. Pink and yellow skin mottled, large and good keepers, A beautiful potato. Next came a bag of German Butterball. This has been grown for a long time but new to me. A small round potato with yellow buttery flesh. They say they are good on the grill. I boiled them and did a course mash with lots of butter and sea salt. Fantastic. All of these potatoes she purchased from “Grand Teton organic seed potatoes “online. You will be inspired to see all the variety there and from what she grew I would say they are a good place to get your seed potatoes and again get inspired. Another potato came out of her bag, Mountain Rose, WOW! This one is spectacular. A brand new bright red inside and out. And she said they are excellent for homemade potato chips. Bonus! I will be making some of those. She bought them from “Potato Garden” online. All in all, it has been a very excellent Farmers Market especially when Beth arrives. You just never know when inspiration will arrive just when you need it. And now newly inspired I am planning on these potatoes to go in the garden. Take a minute and go these websites and have a look. Another special treat she sells is Kohlrabi. Let’s take a look at this plant. Greman turnip or Turnip cabbage. Brassica oleracea, a low stout cultivar of wild cabbage. They are a rounded glode from the swollen stem. The leaves are also edible. They taste like a broccoli stem or cabbage heart but sweeter. They come in three colors, pale green, white and purple, all are pale yellow inside. They are often prepared raw such as slaw and strips for salads. And this is a funny looking vegetable. like something from another world, but don’t let that put you off. This is delicious crisp food and grows here just fine. Another one to place on the list for next years garden. And just think I was feeling uninspired. Thank You, Beth Mcmahon, for the inspiration and all the great education and where to get these beauties from! Outgrowing green and working on the garden journal planner Jannie

Longer Days & Colder Nights

Gardening with Jannie Vaught

Longer days and colder temperatures make the fruit trees happy. Since we had a poor peach harvest last year these cold and cold units, hours of cold, bring hope for a decent peace fruit set for this coming 2018. Winter is the time for this gardener that means research, study and read or read again. And the topic that is top of my list is the Permaculture Zones. You can find them on PermacultureVisions.com. Here is an overview and how I am using this tool to better organize my time in the garden and surrounding area. In permaculture, we break the design up into Zones according to the amount of attention each area requires. 0 through 5. Zone 0 – Home= indoor production (sprouts microgreens and fermentation) and processing of food, waste, water collection, repairs and education. Zone 1 – area outdoors needing regular observation, tending and harvesting eg. plants we can browse and use each day.-intensive garden beds. Zone 2 – Less attention managed areas but with aminals needing daily attention eg. poultry, rabbits, worm bins, orchard trees. Zone 3 – Occasional visited areas with self-fed animals (stock) and seasonal wide-ranging crops eg. corn, wheat, rice, bamboo, pumpkin. Zone 4- Wild food gathering (eg. nuts, native fruits) Wood for fuel, self-seeding trees. Zone 5- Natural area – a rarely visited area, linked with neighboring wildlife corridors. Sometimes managed to reduce the risk of catastrophes ie. fire/polution/drough/ hurricane. Now you have the Zones how do they apply to your homestead or garden area. They may be small places or vast acreage. Take the time to write down the zones on separate pieces of paper and on the top write Zone 0. and the description. Now under this make small boxes and write what needs to be done in these zones at each season. This gives you a good organization for work done in each season you can check off what needs to be done within that zone. For example in Zone 2 – Box for prune fruit trees. Box for a spray with dormant oil. I have then hanging in my mud rood on magnetic hooks so I can see them as I exit the house and refer to them. You may find yourself with more time to spend in the close to the home zone and less time trying to figure out what needs to be done. These are simply some ways to manage your work and time. I find this better than a list. And reusable year to year as well. I am expecting we have a most excellent 2018 garden season. Outgrowing green and organizing for 2018 Jannie

Gardening Planning & Mistakes

Gardening with Jannie Vaught

Garden planning and mistakes are all tools for learning and growing. Over the years we learn as gardeners. We work on getting our soil healthy with so many ways it becomes a full-time job learning what and how. Let’s get back to some basic garden principles. Where do you live and where are you planning on placing your garden or have already paced your garden plot? First, find your growing zone. USDA Plant hardiness zone map is the standard by which gardeners and growers can determine which plants are most likely to thrive at a location. The map is based on average annual minimum winter temperature, divided into10-degree F zones. Go to USDA Plant Hardiness zone map. planthardeiness.ars.usda.gov/. Vegetable gardening growing charts, Garden planning guides, Are all abundant to have fee online. And your seed company will have the zones on the seed information. Use the back of the seed package for light needs, spacing and when to plant in the ground. Remember the magic number is 60 degrees soil temperature taken mid-morning 4 inches deep with a reasonably good thermometer, for at least a week. Or local Agriculture office has growing charts available. Many seed catalogs have growing charts and zones in their catalogs. I strongly recommend a garden journal to keep your notes and dates and drawing of your garden and trees from year to ear. I also have homemade chalkboards over my garden bench to be used for watering times and feeding. Be patient and observe the sun at all the seasons. Where and when it rises. You want to try and line your rows north to south for maximum sun and also shading. Plant the smaller or lower growing plants in the front or north side then medium tall plants then the tall plants like tomatoes in cages and peppers then bean trellises in the southern end. Keeping sun-loving plants in full sun and maybe those who like some shade in between the tall rows. I personally have tried every direction and have had some good and not so good results. It is always live and learn and try again.  The last frost date is another important date to add to the list. First and Last frost date for zone 8. The first frost is November 15, Last frost date is March 15 so the chart says. I write this in Big Bold letters in my garden journal. If you are wanting to start tomatoes inside and want them for planting after the last frost date. Start tomato, lettuce and pepper seeds 6 weeks before your last frost date. Start in mid-February. You can prepare your onion plot go in 4 to 6 weeks before your last estimated spring frost this makes it mid-February or at least 20-degree soil temperature. Using onion sets which are last years bulbs which come with no green top and are either white yellow or red, usually, no variety is given or with onion starts which are harvested now and will hold when kept cool and not placed in water or soil till ready to plant. They are available now in our LLano Feed and Supply store. I have started early and had some slow or loss so again use your thermometer and watch the frost. Also, potatoes are coming in soon. The three listed are the only ones I start inside. Remember we have a long hot growing season with plenty of time to get seeds in the ground. We have 238 frost free days. I prefer to start on the later side as I have lost so many starts by starting too early and they get too tall and leggy or I get anxious and setting out to soon and have slow or lost starts. It seems seasoned gardener all have their own most excellent way they grow. Remember these are basic guidelines. Not hard and fast rules. Because in gardening there is the one thing that a guide can’t tell you. It is your own intuition and good old common sense. And some really great neighbors who are more than willing to help with all the experience they too have acquired. I’m out prepping the soil again today. Hope your growing green too, Jannie

ALTERNATIVE / HOLISTIC HEALTH CARE BY BRIDGETTE LYN DOLGOFF

Holistic / Alternative Health Care by Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff for Health (Mental, Emotional, Physical & Spiritual), Nutrition (Nutrient, Diets, Illness, Pain), Energy Medicine (Energy Fields, Body, Spirit),  Structural Medicine (Bones, Tissues, Patterns, Memory) and more For People, Animals, Communities, Environments, Personal and Business

“I cured with the power that came through me. Of course, it was not I who cured, it was the power from the Outer World, the visions and the ceremonies had only made me like a hole through which the power could come to the two-leggeds.” Black Elk

Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff Traditional Osteopath for over 25 years. Lifetime student of the old world Shamanism. Biodynamic Farmer, Nutritionist  & Farmacist.

Bridgette consults, educates, lectures and does hands of builds of food productions large and small (Urban Farm Project).

Bridgette consults, coaches, lectures, and educates with the focus on microbial, biological, nutrient-dense foods as medicine.(Nutritionist / Farmacist)

Bridgette consults, coaches, lectures, educates and hands-on when needed for people, animals, environments, personal and business to create foundations in shamanism system and practices for all aspects of daily life (Energy Medicine).

Bridgette consults, coaches, lectures, educates and works on people and animals in person. Correction of the brain connections and body connection to arrest disease (Mental, Emotional, Physical & Spiritual). Restoration of structure, body systems, and muscle memories for head trauma, injury, abuse, birth trauma and pain (Traditional Osteopath / Structural Medicine).

So long as one feeds on the food from unhealthy soil, the spirit will lack the stamina to free itself from the prison of the body. RUDOLF STEINER

MISCELLANEOUS 

Holistic / Alternative Medicine for Animals (energy, structural, nutritional, environmental)  https://coe-llc.com/traditional-osteopathic-medicine-for-animals/

Products https://ministryofconsciousnessnevada.org/shamanism-products

All things exist by agreement. Lynn Andrews

A life predicted by time. Lynn Andrews

 

MEDIA

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/bridgenit

Steemit https://steemit.com/@bridgenit

Revolution Radio http://freedomslips.com/index.php/schedules/schedule-a/14-sample-data-articles/103-carrying-stones-digging-holes

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/bridgette.lyn.dolgoff

“In order to keep us obedient and meek and weak, the predators engaged themselves in a stupendous maneuver – stupendous, of course, from the point of view of a fighting strategist. A horrendous maneuver from the point of view of those who suffer it. They gave us their mind!  Through the mind, which, after all, is their mind, the predators inject into the lives of human beings whatever is convenient for them.” Don Juan Matus

CONTACT 

Skype Bridgneit

Phone 775.624.7862 (Please leave a message, most days out on the land, traveling and cannot answer)

Email bridgenit@gmail.com

Website Contact Page https://coe-llc.com/contact-coe-moc-rrs-bridgenit/

“We often hesitate to follow our intuition out of fear. Most usually, we are afraid of the changes in our own life that our actions will bring. Intuitive guidance, however, is all about change. It is energetic data ripe with the potential to influence the rest of the world. To fear change but to crave intuitive clarity is like fearing the cold, dark night while pouring water on the fire that lights your cave. An insight the size of a mustard seed is powerful enough to bring down a mountain-sized illusion that may be holding our lives together. Truth strikes without mercy. We fear our intuitions because we fear the transformational power within our revelations.” Caroline Myss

 

AFFILIATED WEBSITES

Ministry Of Consciousness https://ministryofconsciousnessnevada.org/

Consciousness Of Economics & Urban Farm Project https://consciousnessofeconomics.com/ 

“Through consciousness, our minds have the power to change our planet and ourselves. It is time we heed the wisdom of the ancient indigenous people and channel our consciousness and spirit to tend the garden and not destroy it. “ Bruce Lipton

BY APPOINTMENT (in person, video call and on site)

Services can be paid for through Pay Pal : 1) by sending you an email invoice & 2) Purchase Center Menu on the bottom of all pages on https://coe-llc.com/

First Appointment by Zoom Meeting $50 USD

Continued Sessions by Zoom Meeting $80 USD per Hour

Hands-On Sessions (in person) $100 USD per Hour

Traveling Sessions can include hourly rate, gas, lodging, food, and supplies.

“What you are seeing and hearing right now is nothing but a dream. You are dreaming right now in this moment. You are dreaming with the brain awake.”
Miguel Ruiz

ZOOM MEETINGS

Zoom Meetings are private online video calls used by Bridgette. Once you book an appointment she will send you a link for the private appointment by zoom, in which you click on to go live for the meeting. It is best to download zoom ahead of time so that the link will take you right to the meeting.

For long distant appointments using PC please download zoom meeting: https://zoom.us/zoomrooms/software for I Phone or I Pad https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/zoompresence/id900259081?ls=1&mt=8

“The farmer, meditating between the realms of nature (mineral, plant, animal, and human)—is thus creating a new agriculture, since he influences processes [i.e., the intake of cosmic forces, and the sending up of earth forces] that give rise to plant life which in turn supports more developed….forms of life….For the future evolution of the earth, man is now really the responsible…actor regarding processes in nature.” Sean O’Connor and Micahel Just

Alternative Medicine Spirit / Energy / Shamanic Consulting

Shamanism Coaching for Personal, Business or Company, Healing Sessions for People, Animals, Business, Home or Environment, and Custom Design Shamanic Medicines.  

Local, Long Distance, Consulting, and Hand On, Affordable.

Bridgette (she walks among stars) working in the everything which the 64-dimensional layers exist, she specializes in her own formats, structures, practices in Shamanism.  Bridgette has the ability to travel timelines to find, collect, clear, restore, shift and balance that which she is focused on. She was born into a family of healers, shamans, herbalists, prophets, exorcists in which her early life was enriched in the teachings and work.

ministryofconsciousnessnevada.org

https://ministryofconsciousnessnevada.org/

ministryofconsciousnessnevada@gmail.com or 775.624.7862 (no texting)

Just When…

Gardening with Jannie

Just when your garden is struggling and your enthusiasm is at an all-time low, something or someone steps into your path and shares with you something that sets that spark alight. This happened this Saturday at our LLano farmers market. Elizabeth Mcmahon “Beth” horticulture county extension agent for Gilespie county, regularly comes to Llano farmers market and has her lovely produce for sale. This Saturday she had potatoes. And not any old potatoes, there were 4 “new to this gardener” varieties available. Purple Viking potato, truly a beautiful purple with lighter colors mottled and swirled. To salon pink. They are creamy white sweet and buttery. All-purpose potato with long shelf life and are scab and somewhat leafhopper resistant. Next, she pulled out Harlequin Gold a new variety that is heat tolerant. Pink and yellow skin mottled, large and good keepers, A beautiful potato. Next came a bag of German Butterball. This has been grown for a long time but new to me. A small round potato with yellow buttery flesh. They say they are good on the grill. I boiled them and did a course mash with lots of butter and sea salt. Fantastic. All of these potatoes she purchased from “Grand Teton organic seed potatoes “online. You will be inspired to see all the variety there and from what she grew I would say they are a good place to get your seed potatoes and again get inspired. Another potato came out of her bag, Mountain Rose, WOW! This one is spectacular. A brand new bright red inside and out. And she said they are excellent for homemade potato chips. Bonus! I will be making some of those. She bought them from “Potato Garden” online. All in all, it has been a very excellent Farmers Market especially when Beth arrives. You just never know when inspiration will arrive just when you need it. And now newly inspired I am planning on these potatoes to go in the garden. Take a minute and go these websites and have a look. Another special treat she sells is Kohlrabi. Let’s take a look at this plant. Greman turnip or Turnip cabbage. Brassica oleracea, a low stout cultivar of wild cabbage. They are a rounded glode from the swollen stem. The leaves are also edible. They taste like a broccoli stem or cabbage heart but sweeter. They come in three colors, pale green, white and purple, all are pale yellow inside. They are often prepared raw such as slaw and strips for salads. And this is a funny looking vegetable. like something from another world, but don’t let that put you off. This is delicious crisp food and grows here just fine. Another one to place on the list for next years garden. And just think I was feeling uninspired. Thank You, Beth Mcmahon, for the inspiration and all the great education and where to get these beauties from! Out growing green and working on the garden journal planner,  Jannie Vaught

Holistic Medicine Spirit / Energy / Shamanic Reno, Nevada

Shamanism Coaching for Personal, Business or Company, Healing Sessions for People, Animals, Business, Home or Environment, and Custom Design Shamanic Medicines.  

Local, Long Distance, Consulting, and Hand On, Affordable.

Bridgette (she walks among stars) working in the everything which the 64-dimensional layers exist, she specializes in her own formats, structures, practices in Shamanism.  Bridgette has the ability to travel timelines to find, collect, clear, restore, shift and balance that which she is focused on. She was born into a family of healers, shamans, herbalists, prophets, exorcists in which her early life was enriched in the teachings and work.

ministryofconsciousnessnevada.org

https://ministryofconsciousnessnevada.org/

ministryofconsciousnessnevada@gmail.com or 775.624.7862 (no texting)

Alternative Medicine Animals Reno, Nevada

Domestic,   Farm, Wildlife Animals with a focus on Mental, Emotional, Physical, Environmental Health.

Local, Long Distance, Consulting, and Hand On, Affordable.

Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff has had abilities to work with animals since she was very young. She has been working on animals now for over 30 years. Holistic and Alternative, Natural Medicine which may include nutrition, acupuncture, acupressure, pain management, PTSD, Sketelal Realignment, deep tissue and animal communication, energy healing, environmental assessments and behavioral understandings.

consciousnessofeconomics@gmail.com or 775.624.7862 (no texting)

Traditional Osteopathic Medicine for Animals