Yogi’s Discovered a Third Way

Yogis discovered a third way, a path that does not split the world into two pain and pleasure, right and wrong, good and bad, sacred and profane. They discovered a path that does not require us to suppress the energy of desire, but allows, us to fully experience it. Patanjali writes of his third way as the development of a kind of “impartially in the spheres of pleasure and pain, virtue and vice.”

The fifteenth-century scripture called Vedantasara The Essence of the Doctrines of Vedanta describes the practice of titiksa, a cultivation of an attitude of impartiality, patients, and endurance towards the pairs of opposites, a practice this scripture honors as one of the six treasures of life.

This impartiality and neutrality towards polarities referred to by some modern yogis, as choiceless awareness. Choiceless awareness is the third way because when we are practicing it, we do not push away any sensation. We do not believe the pairs of opposites can be separated. Rather, we develop our capacity to experience the way things are, to live each moment fully, to receive the whole light and sounds show.

In a sense, we do not choose against any experience, we choose for all of it.

A Flight from Clear SEEING & its IMPLICATIONS

We will see that in order to get our basic needs to take care of as a child, we had to learn precisely how much not to see certain aspects of reality, we commit to not seeing the truth as a way of coping.

Many spiritual seekers participate to some degree in this strategy. Much of a spiritual practice then becomes, in fact, a flight from clear seeing and its implications. Harvard psychologist Jack Engler gives us a very helpful list of some of the ways in which AVOIDANCE of the real can motivate our so-called spiritual paths. For some of us, spirituality can be unconsciously driven by:

  • A quest for perfection and invulnerability. We may feel especially prone to the quest for perfection if we feel all too imperfect, or if we have been badly hurt and don’t want to ever have to feel that vulnerable again.
  • A fear of Individuation. We may be anxious about stepping out into the world, assuming responsibility for ourselves and our life, shrinking back from competition, comparisons, or achievement.
  • Avoidance of Commitment and Accountability. We might conveniently relabel this avoidance spiritual “detachment” or, in New Age terminology, “just going with the flow”.
  • A Fear of Intimacy and Social Involvement. It’s striking how many of us drawn to spiritual life have a history of difficulties with intimacy and closeness in relationships, or disappointments in love, and how being in a spiritual community allows us to feel a sense of belonging without resolving these underlying fears.
  • An Inability to Grieve and Mourn Important Losses. All the spiritual teachings and practices about “letting go”, “renunciation” or “detachment” can actually substitute for a genuine facing of personal grief and loss, and the painful feelings associated with it.
  • An Avoidance of Feelings. So many drawn to spiritual practice have difficulty with strong emotions like anger, sadness, and disappointment. Spiritual traditions label these as kleshas and as unwholesome, and so we may take this to mean we shouldn’t feel them, and then we feel guilty or unspiritual if we do. Sometimes the experience of pleasure and sexuality seems to be even more problematic for the people drawn to spiritual practice.

We Fall Down

We fall down and down, until we touch the ground, until we relate with the basic sanity of the earth.

We become the lowest of the low, the smallest of the small, a grain of sand, perfectly simple, no exceptions….

If you are a grain of sand, the rest of the universe, all the space. all the room is yours, because you obstruct nothing, overcrowd nothing, possess nothing.

There is tremendous openness.

You are the emperor of the universe because you are a grain of sand.

Chogyam Trungpa, Rinpoche

Yoga Means

Yoga means that now there is no hope, now there is no future, now there is are no desires. One is ready to know what is. One is not interested in what can be, what should be, what ought to be. One is not interested! One is interested only in that which is because only the real can free you, only the reality can become liberation.

Total despair is needed. That despair is called dukkha by Buddha. And if you are really in misery, don’t hope, because your hope will only prolong the misery. Your hope is a drug. It can help you to reach death only nowhere else. All your hopes can lead you only to death.

Become totally hopeless, no future, no hope. Difficult. Needs courage to face the real. But such a moment comes to everyone some time or another. A moment comes to every human being when he feels total hopelessness. Absolute meaninglessness happens to him. When he becomes aware that whatsoever he is doing is useless, wheresoever he is going, he is going nowhere, all his life is meaningless, suddenly hopes drop, future drops, and for the time you are face to face with the reality… When you are not moving into the future, not moving toward the past then you start moving within yourself, because your being is is here and now. You are present here and now. You can enter this reality.

Bhagwan S. Rajneesh his comments on the Yogasutras

In Addition To…

End Suffering

In addition to the mind, body, and personality, yoga teaches that the true home of the soul is also beyond time and space, in the external now of consciousness. When we live disconnected from the vast roots of the Self, We suffer. Self is capitalized here because it refers to the divine, awake, free self. Giving the yogic view of our predicament, it’s not surprising that we are often so estranged, that we feel unreal, that we feel disconnected from our center. That is precisely our condition.

The classical “scriptures” identify five “afflictions” or kleshas, five conditioned beliefs and behaviors that keep us bound to ” gross apparent reality.” They are:

Ignorance, I-ness, Attraction, Aversion, Clinging to life, and fear of death.

Ignorance is the ground from which all other afflictions spring. Out of Ignorance arises I-ness the belief in and clinging to a separate, solid, “small s” self. Out of the I-ness arise attraction and aversion, our complete identification with our likes and dislikes. And out of this inevitably arises clinging to life and fear of death, a deluded and desperate desire for life to be small, neat, permanent, and solid rather than vast, incomprehensible, impermanent, and discontinuous as it really is.

In addition to the five afflictions, the scriptures also identify four erroneous beliefs that sustain the delusion of the kleshas. These are:

The belief in the permanence of objects, The belief in the ultimate reality of the body, The belief that our state of suffering IS REALLY HAPPINESS, and The belief that our bodies, minds, and feelings are our true selves.

 

 

On His Final Night of Enlighten’ment

On the night of his final enlightenment, even the Buddha had to call on the power of the Earth goddess, the divine Shakti, for help with the forces of Mara/s, the dark powers of delusion. Buddha touched the ground where he sat. “This Earth,” he said, “is my witness.” This statement could be taken further: this Earth is my family member, my sister, myself. 

Demonic Forces: The Four Maras

  • To make one ecstatic (dga’-byed)
  • To make one crave (sred-byed)
  • To make one stupefied (rmongs-byed), which perhaps suggests making one spaced out or senile
  • To make one thin, emaciated and dried out (skem-byed), which, in this context, could mean worn out, hungry, and thirsty, so that one gives up meditation. In other contexts, perhaps it is the work of Mara that we become dried out and have no moisture of compassion.
  • To make one dead (‘chi-byed), which, in this context, could perhaps make Shiva worry that he will die while meditating, so being afraid of that, he would get up.

https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/lam-rim/samsara-nirvana/demonic-forces-the-four-maras

 

IF you have to make up Rules..

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If you have to make up rules, boundaries, guidelines for another person to engage with you or others, best not to engage with them. The reason is that you would set up verbal barricades is to protect yourself.

Sometimes we are not meant to all get along.

Sometimes it is too dangerous to engage mentally, emotionally, physically, energetically for yourself, others, and for the person in which verbal barriers are being made.

And because we have made these rules of engagement, human tendencies are to tear down, break down and go against rules so what could possibly go wrong when “the engage” starts with you protecting yourself and setting up “the rules of engagement.

We spend to much time in failure energy which we are constantly using to engage.

Me, personally, in the past spent most of my waking life trying to get along with everyone. Everything outside of me was much more important than what was inside me. I spent far to much time getting along than following my inside, my dreams!

Sometimes it is better to walk away, change directions, let go, refocus, restore, regenerate then to use energy and time in ways that produce failure.

Always be kind.

Talk to yourself more.

Set the rules and boundaries for yourself, that way you will know when to disengage because YOUR matters most!

BRIDGENIT

Knowledge your Suffering

End Suffering
We have tried everything to get rid of suffering.
We have gone everywhere to get rid of suffering.
We have bought everything to get rid of it.
We have ingested everything to get rid of it.
Finally, when one has tried enough, there arises the possibility of spiritual maturity with the willingness to stop the futile attempt to get rid of it and, instead, to actually experience suffering. In that momentous instant, there is the realization of that which is beyond suffering, of that which is untouched by suffering.
“There is a realization of who one truly is.”
Gangaji