Lemnisacte Rhythm~Vibrational Therapy for Chronic Issues

Hands-on Therapy by Bridgette

Aligns many traditions in one single dance of cosmic rhythm and aligns brings what is above to the below restoring and regulating systems that are blocked, in pain, dis-eased from a multitude of reasons.

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Sutherland described alternating coiling and uncoiling of the convolutions, or gyri, of the brain. He named the expansion phase the inhalation or flexion phase of the cycle. He termed the constriction phase the exhalation, or extension phase of this cycling of the Primary Respiratory Mechanism. Sutherland recognized the convolutions and fissures of the brain as being
designed to accommodate the intrinsic rhythmical activity of the brain, coiling, and uncoiling in a spiral form. This spiral form of the structures of the brain allows motion to take place in a synchronous fashion, fitting into the structures of the dura mater and cranium. This motion is very subtle (Sutherland 1998, 74-75, 119, Sutherland 1990, 63, 64, 172).

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Cranial Traditions

The dawning of the Cranial Tradition: Egypt

A papyrus that is believed to be the copy of an ancient Egyptian Medical treatise from c. 3000 BE. It is considered the oldest known surviving trauma text in history, especially regarding the spinal injury.  It describes 48 clinical cases, mostly neurological conditions. They contain the first description of liquid in the cranium and movement of the brain.

The dawning of the Cranial Tradition: Traditional Chinese Medicine

The Ling-shu 3rd century B.C. Lingshu Jing also known as Divine Pivot or a Spiritual Pivot is an ancient Chinese Medical text c. 1st century BCE, part of the Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon. It makes reference to brain fluids: “When the refined fluids…blend harmoniously, they constitute a Kao (lubricant) that is washed into the empty spaces of the bones and also replenishes the brain and medulla.

The dawning of the Cranial Tradition: Hippocrates 

Hippocrates of Kos 460-375 BC held that the soul was in the brain. He described “water” surrounding the brain and described two meninges around the brain, one is thick whereas the other one is thin, and explains that the brain is divided into two halves separated by a membrane.

The dawning of the Cranial Tradition: Galen

700 years after Hippocrates, Claudius Galen of Pergamon, the most famous Roman physician wrote: “In newborn and in trepanning of the cranium the brain seems to clearly rise up and dilate during inspiration, and shrink and contract during expiration.”

The dawning of Cranial Tradition: Iatromechanists

Iatromechanists was a school of medicine in the seventeenth century that attempted to explain the physiological phenomena in mechanical terms. People who were Iatromechanists: Willam Harvey 1578-1657, Francois Bacon 1561-1626, Giorgio Baglivi 1668-1707, Giovanni Borelli 1608-1697, and Emanuel Swedenborg.

Not only did Swedenborg describe intricacies of the cerebral cortex but he also discovered the perivascular spaces, the foramen of Magendie, and the cerebrospinal fluid. He noted the importance of the pituitary gland or “arch gland” in maintaining normal neurological function. Pioneer of Neuroanatomy

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00381-011-1422-0#:~:text=Not%20only%20did%20Swedenborg%20describe,in%20maintaining%20normal%20neurological%20function.

Swedenborg & Sutherland

https://cranialintelligence.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/swendenborg-sutherland-3.pdf

Intracranial Hypertension (IH) is characterized by increased pressure inside the skull. Intracranial means inside the skull and hypertension means high fluid pressure. Intracranial hypertension means that the pressure of the fluid that surrounds the brain (cerebrospinal fluid or CSF) is too high. Elevated CSF pressure can cause two problems, severe headache and visual loss. If the elevated CSF pressure remains untreated, permanent visual loss or blindness may result. Pseudotumor cerebri and benign intracranial hypertension are both former names for IH, which are now considered inaccurate. These names do not adequately describe the disorder and downplay the seriousness of IH.

https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/idiopathic-intracranial-hypertension/#:~:text=Intracranial%20hypertension%20means%20that%20the,loss%20or%20blindness%20may%20result.

A blow to the head can result in anything from a superficial skin laceration to severe brain injury. The extremes of this range are easy to recognize by clinical examination and neuroimaging, but whether the brain has been injured by a blow to the head (in the presence of nonspecific symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, or headache) is more difficult to assess. The definition of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) has changed over the past 60 years, but the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine currently defines mild TBI as head trauma resulting in one of the following: loss of consciousness for less than 30 min, alteration of mental state for up to 24 h (being dazed, confused or disorientated), or loss of memory for events immediately before or after the trauma

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4513656/

Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Followed by Cerebrospinal Fluid Complications

https://www.nature.com/articles/sc199026.pdf?origin=ppub

What is Cranial Osteopathy?

https://tbitherapy.com/cranial-osteopathy/#:~:text=Cranial%20osteopathy%2C%20also%20known%20as,bones%2C%20membranes%2C%20and%20CSF.

For more information and help regarding CSF conditions please contact Bridgette @ bridgenit@gmail.com. Bridgette is a Traditional Osteopath that specializes in many hands-on safe, effective treatments for CSF issues. She sees people by appointment in person in the Reno area and surrounding and online by zoom conference call. Please see fees. 

 

Very similarly structured, the brain and the universe. | Картинки с черепами, Туманности, Кислотное искусство

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Sense of Sight

Steiner’s twelve senses can be grouped into three categories. He distinguished senses which relate to the perception of:
• your body: the senses of touch, of life, of movement, of balance
• the external world: smell, taste, sight, temperature
• the immaterial, spiritual world: hearing, speech, thought, ego

Will, feeling, thought
• The first four senses, the lowest, are called physical senses, or senses of the will because they are used to perceive one’s own body.
• The middle four senses are the senses of feeling. Observations made with these senses arouse feelings. These senses are also reflected in our language: a tastefully furnished house, a sourpuss, hard to swallow, heart-warming, cold thought.
• The last four senses, the highest, focus particularly on the other. These are the spiritual or knowledge senses and they are used in the observation of other people.

Your eyes are your most important sensory organ. They are the only organs
located visibly on your body’s surface. “Seeing” is often used synonymously
for “observing” or “understanding”. Yet in actual fact, your eyes only see
colours and light and dark. You can see shapes, motion and proportions
because your eyes move and work together with the senses of movement
and balance. It is easier to block visual stimuli than smells or tastes. There is a distance between you and what you see and thus you observe more consciously. Of all your senses, sight contributes most to your awareness. You are an organism with conscious thought, which is intricately involved with the act of seeing. This also means that it is easier to be mistaken about
what you see than what you smell, for example. Sometimes, your thoughts determine what you see. You can experience this in two of the exercises, below. The sense of sight is the most popular sense for scientific observation. Everything is expressed visually, often in numbers, because the eyes are supposed more reliable than other, ‘more primitive’ senses such as
smell and taste. The eyes are considered to be objective.
The eye is a transparent oval ball into which light enters. Light rays first pass through the cornea and then through the pupil. The pupil detracts and expands, depending on how little or how much light there is. The pupil is located in the centre of the iris. After passing through the pupil, the light is
concentrated by the lens, it passes through the eyeball and falls onto the retina. The retina has conical and rod-shaped receptors. The eyeball is made up of a transparent, colourless, jellylike substance containing 99% water. The tissue of the cornea has a somewhat crystalloid structure. The rod-shaped photo-receptors on the retina (pars optical) can sense light and dark, while the conical-shaped receptors (pars caeca) are sensitive to colours.
The pars optical adapt very well to changes in the degree of light, as you will have experienced on entering a darkened room. First, you see nothing, but after a while, you can see quite a lot and find your way around. You cannot see the colours in the dark. The yellow spot is the most sensitive part of the retina
and is made up solely of pars caeca. The place where the bundled optical nerve leaves the eye is called the blind spot, as the eye has no receptors to register anything here.

Most people can see about 150 colours, though some can see more. We can perceive the subtlest differences in the colour green. Colours can affect your mood. Red makes people active. It is perceived as being lively and restless and boosts strength and energy. Orange makes people enthusiastic, while yellow
radiates and gives a sense of cheer. Green is restful and balanced. Blue is a cool colour and stimulates thought. White is the reflection of the spirit; it gives us a sense of purity and symbolises chastity. Black, on the other hand, evokes human sorrow. Goethe discovered that colours are a result of the play between light and dark. You see red, orange and yellow when you look out of the dark at something light, the sunset for instance. Blue and violet
predominate when you look from the light at something dark. That is why the sky is blue: it is light here on earth, but black in space.
Goethe put it this way: light’s victory over darkness results in active colours (red, orange and yellow), while the victory of darkness over light brings out passive colours (blue, indigo and violet). You can verify this by looking at a rainbow. The sky is always darker at the top of the rainbow than at the bottom, and the red is always on the top where it is darker, and the violet on the bottom, where it is lighter. You can find evidence for this rule in brown eyes, where the iris is red nearest the pupil and green or bluish nearest the
white of the eye.
Colours are arranged on a colour wheel in a succession of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet, then back to red and so on. Only colour can be arranged in this type of wheel, it does not work with other observations.
When you stare at a colour intensely for a while and then look away, you will see an after-image, an image whose colour is the opposite, or the complement (on the colour wheel), of the original. For example, if you stare at a violet-red object for a minute, you will see an after-image made up of green
and blue since green complements violet and blue complements red. During prolonged exposure to a bright colour, the conical receptors on the retina that perceive the colour become desensitised. The negative after-image occurs during the recovery of the desensitised retina. The colour of the after-image is
not a physical, material colour; rather, it has a lingering, unearthly and transparent quality. You could describe it as an etheric colour.
The effect of colours on mood has been demonstrated effectively in scientific experiments such as the following. The subjects in this experiment did not know what the purpose of the experiment was. One half of the group was told to paint a certain picture with red paint, while the other half was told to paint the same picture with blue paint. After fifteen minutes of painting, the group using red paint was louder and more restless than the group using blue paint. This experiment showed how mood was affected by these colours.
Another experiment was carried out in a factory. One room in the factory was painted in the usual colours and the other in soft, human tones. Before long, workers in the second room had achieved a 15% higher production rate and taken 30% less sick leave than those in the first room.

Exercises
Observe the two objects below. What do you see? What else can you see? Can you change your focus from one observation to the other? Then what do you experience?
Place a coloured sheet on top of a white piece of paper. Stare at the coloured sheet for a minute, then remove it and continue staring at the white paper. What colour do you see now? What qualities would you ascribe to this colour, compared to the coloured sheet? Do this exercise for each of the colours of the rainbow and find their complementary colours or opposites.
Painting exercise: paint something in one colour. After half an hour, see what sort of mood you are in. It is better to do this exercise with a partner: let one person do the painting while the other observes the painter.
Hold a hand in front of your left eye, and look at the dot below with your right eye. Move the book gradually closer and farther away from your face. At most distances, you will see the star to the right of the dot, except for one particular distance when the image of the star falls onto your blind spot.
Take a simple natural, living object such as a leaf. Make a larger-than-life drawing of it. Try to recreate the different shades of colour as accurately as possible by mixing your paints. Painting requires you to look with increasing accuracy and thus improves your ability to observe visually. This
exercise also demonstrates that the colours you see are composite colours.

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Sense of Temperature

Steiner’s twelve senses can be grouped into three categories. He distinguished senses which relate to the perception of:
• your body: the senses of touch, of life, of movement, of balance
• the external world: smell, taste, sight, temperature
• the immaterial, spiritual world: hearing, speech, thought, ego

Will, feeling, thought
• The first four senses, the lowest, are called physical senses, or senses of the will because they are used to perceive one’s own body.
• The middle four senses are the senses of feeling. Observations made with these senses arouse feelings. These senses are also reflected in our language: a tastefully furnished house, a sourpuss, hard to swallow, heart-warming, cold thought.
• The last four senses, the highest, focus particularly on the other. These are the spiritual or knowledge senses and they are used in the observation of other people.

Sense of temperature
You use your sense of temperature to observe how hot or cold objects or
your surroundings are. The sense of temperature is made up of distinct
sensory receptors for hot and cold located in the dermis. There are more
receptors for cold than for hot. As with the sense of touch, every part of
your skin senses temperature. There is a difference, however. When
something touches you, you feel which part of your body is touched. The
sense of temperature is observed in relation to your own temperature and to
the body surface area being exposed to coldness or heat. If you put your
finger in a bucket of water, and then into the water that is 3 degrees warmer, you would hardly feel the difference. You would feel some difference if you stuck your hand into the buckets, and if you submerged your entire lower arm you would feel the temperature difference even more strongly.
The larger the surface area perceiving the change in temperature, the more accurately you estimate the difference. Lying naked in a bath, you can perceive deviations of only 0.3 degrees Celsius. When the bathwater has cooled a little, you will perceive it as a large difference.
Warmth and cold enter your body through your skin. By exposing a large area of skin to warmth, more warmth can enter the body and you would feel warmer than if you only exposed a small part of your skin.
Because of your sense of touch, you know that something is situated outside your body. In perceiving the temperature outside your body, however, the cold or warmth penetrates into you. Likewise, we do not feel the temperature as being only of the outside of an object but perceive it as coming from the whole
object, as radiating from the inside.
Your sense of temperature is closely connected to your own temperature. In other words, you do not measure absolute temperatures, but temperatures relative to your own. Put one hand in water at 10 degrees for three minutes, and the other in the water at 40 degrees; then submerge them both at 27 degrees.
For a few minutes, this water will seem cold to one hand and warm to the other. This effect slowly fades until both hands –feel the same temperature.
Temperature affects your mood more strongly than other senses. This is partly because the sense covers your whole body, and for another part because warmth or cold can make your whole body feel comfortable or uncomfortable. The cold chills you, and severe cold can numb or even paralyze you.
Warmth can make you feel enthusiastic, but too much heat can cause apathy. Only moderate temperatures do not affect your mood. You should also take account of warmth and cold for the sake of your social life. If you want to get to
know somebody, radiate warmth. You can then expect warmth in return. But if you feel cold, you will feel rejected. You need to feel the warmth from your fellow human beings, otherwise, you cannot live in a community. There is a reason for such sayings as to be left out in the cold.

Exercises
Fill three bowls of water at temperatures of 10, 27, and 40 degrees Celsius, respectively. Hold one hand in the 10-degree water for 3 minutes and the other in the 40-degree water. Then put both hands in the middle bowl for some minutes. Describe your observations.
Fill two buckets with water of different temperatures. The difference should be 3 degrees Celsius. Put a finger in one bucket of water for 3 minutes, and then in the other bucket. Repeat this with a hand, and if possible with your lower arm. Keep the temperature of the water constant (use a
thermometer!). Describe your observations.
Measure the surface temperature of an animal, for example, a cow, by placing your hands on various parts of its body (side, legs, head, horns, nose, etc). Which parts are warmer, which parts are colder?
Search your memory for situations in which the atmosphere between people were warm, and situations in which the atmosphere was cool. Discuss these with your group. Can you discover any patterns?

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Cold or Warm, Can We Really Tell? - Scientific American

 

Sense of Taste

Steiner’s twelve senses can be grouped into three categories. He distinguished senses which relate to the perception of:
• your body: the senses of touch, of life, of movement, of balance
• the external world: smell, taste, sight, temperature
• the immaterial, spiritual world: hearing, speech, thought, ego

Will, feeling, thought
• The first four senses, the lowest, are called physical senses, or senses of the will because they are used to perceive one’s own body.
• The middle four senses are the senses of feeling. Observations made with these senses arouse feelings. These senses are also reflected in our language: a tastefully furnished house, a sourpuss, hard to swallow, heart-warming, cold thought.
• The last four senses, the highest, focus particularly on the other. These are the spiritual or knowledge senses and they are used in the observation of other people.

Sense of taste
The tongue is the organ of taste. In order to taste something, you must actually put it in your mouth. In addition, the substance must be dissolved
in water or saliva, as you can only taste liquids or soluble solids.
The observation of taste is made up of two components, the actual taste of
something and its smell. When something is in your mouth, its smell enters
your nose. When you put something in your mouth, its smell can change as
new scent particles are released. Actual taste is limited to four possibilities:
sweet, sour, salty, and bitter. If you hold your nose and put something in
your mouth, you will only be able to distinguish these four tastes. There would be no olfactory observations. If you couldn’t smell, all jams would taste the same: sugary and sweet.
The four tastes are perceived by the tongue which has four zones, one for each taste. The sweet zone is on the tip of your tongue, so you will
perceive this taste first. The receptors for sour and salty are on the sides of the tongue, and bitter is tasted at the back edge of the tongue. You cannot bear very strong tastes: with the exception of sweet, too much of any
taste quickly becomes an unpleasant experience. Children have the greatest difficulty learning to appreciate bitter foods, as bitterness is the quickest to taste bad. Even as adults, we can tolerate only a little bitterness. Sour things are often perceived as being refreshing, while salt is rarely perceived but draws out the full palate of tastes. For example, an unsalted boiled egg
has little taste, but once you sprinkle some salt on it, it tastes just like an egg should.
Our judgment of food, and whether or not it is healthy, is determined in part by taste. You can taste whether something is good for you or not, and you also know very well if you are taking that extra bite because you’re still hungry or because you don’t want to offend the cook. You can strengthen your emotive judgment by focusing your attention on how something tastes.

Exercises
Taste different foods, first while you are holding your nose and then without holding your nose. What observations can you make?
Make liquid solutions for each of the tastes sweet, sour, salty, and bitter. You can make a bitter solution by steeping used coffee grounds in water. Brush each taste in turn on different parts of someone’s tongue. Do not let the subject know which taste is being brushed onto the tongue. Ask
the subject to describe his observations, and what he tastes.
Hold your nose and close your eyes, and ask someone to put something in your mouth. Do not move your tongue. Try to find out what it is. First, only rely on your sense of taste. Then feel it by rolling it around in your mouth. Then stop holding your nose so you can smell. Describe the differences in
your observations. At what point could you guess what was in your mouth?

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Tongues 'taste' water by sensing sour | Science News for Students

Sense of Smell

Steiner’s twelve senses can be grouped into three categories. He distinguished senses which relate to the perception of:
• your body: the senses of touch, of life, of movement, of balance
• the external world: smell, taste, sight, temperature
• the immaterial, spiritual world: hearing, speech, thought, ego

Will, feeling, thought
• The first four senses, the lowest, are called physical senses, or senses of the will because they are used to perceive one’s own body.
• The middle four senses are the senses of feeling. Observations made with these senses arouse feelings. These senses are also reflected in our language: a tastefully furnished house, a sourpuss, hard to swallow, heart-warming, cold thought.
• The last four senses, the highest, focus particularly on the other. These are the spiritual or knowledge senses and they are used in the observation of other people.

You smell things with your nose. Each time you breathe in, new scent
particles brush past the nasal mucosa deep inside your nose. The nasal
mucosa is connected directly with your brain by a short nerve so that you
perceive scents almost immediately. It is so fast that you can be taken by
surprise when you suddenly smell something. You cannot block out scents
without holding your breath, which you can never do for long. When you
have been exposed to a scent for a while, you stop noticing it, nor will you
notice a gradual strengthening of the scent. You only notice it if you go
away from it for a while and then come back to it. In that case, you will probably be amazed that you did not notice it before.
This can be illustrated by the following example. Once, my team and I had to clean the small intestines of a cow. In this procedure, the intestinal contents are slowly pushed out of the intestines. Even as the volume of drained intestinal content — and thus the smell — increased, we were hardly aware of the stench in which we were working. At some point we went for a tea break and only then, in the clean air did we notice the awful smell on our hands and clothing. When we went back to work, the stench was almost unbearable, but after a few minutes, we were again oblivious to it. It is possible for a strong smell to cause nausea. In that case, you remain focused on the smell and continue to perceive it.
Since you have to keep breathing, you cannot help but perceive scents. There is no way to block them out. You perceive scent immediately and classify it as distasteful or tasteful, pleasant or unpleasant, vile or attractive. Scent strongly influences your judgment. Your experience tells you that bad things or things that you dislike always smell. Volcanoes, rotting food and toxic substances all
have a foul smell. Natural substances that are good for you are not perceived as smelling bad.
In this way, your sense of smell forms one of the foundations of your moral judgment. Your sense of smell thus helps you to distinguish between good and evil. People can distinguish about 2000 scents, from roses and camomile to the smell of horses, goats, and cows; from milk, wine, cola, and beer to wood, cement, asphalt, and stone, and so on.
You recognize the scent of a fresh spring day or a scorching summer afternoon. You can distinguish the particular smell of a Tuscan village, a peat bog, a book-lined study, or a sick-bay. You can also smell someone’s mood:
someone who is afraid emanates different scent particles than someone who is at ease.
You respond to all these smells, usually without being conscious of it.
Observations of smell differ from other observations of, for example, taste and sound because scents are difficult to categorize and describe. Scents are often described by association: the smell of roses, blueberries, of fresh fruit, of grease. Or people might say: this reminds me of a head of lettuce, or of an
old shoe, or of grandma’s house. Smells can be described by using other observations which are associated with the smell. It is possible to determine the chemical composition of scent, and in many cases, it can be synthesized. Many of our perfumes and artificial scents (often called flavorings) are made
chemically.
Smells can bring back memories suddenly and strongly. You might be walking along a street when a familiar smell suddenly takes you right back to the past, and to the occasion that you smelt it before. For a moment, you are submerged by memories. This often happens without being consciously aware of
having perceived the smell. Scents and smells can affect you more strongly in this way than observations made with other senses. Our sense of smell is quite primitive compared to that of animals. A dog’s sense of smell is a million times
more sensitive than ours. A dog has no trouble smelling the fear of a passer-by and responds directly.
Because of the short reaction time, instinct is closely connected to the sense of smell. An animal’s behavior is thus determined to a large degree by what it smells. If your sense of smell was as good as an animal’s, you would constantly be making strong judgments and be incapable of more objective
observation. Your sensitivity to scents would leave no scope for a personal response, and your thoughts would be more instinctive. As a result, you would be at the mercy of what your sense of smell told you.

Exercises
Select some food and drinks, and describe their scent. When you have finished, take a short break, then smell them again and record any judgments they provoked. Did they arouse any memories? If so, describe them.
Go to a place in the woods, or in a barn or field, and describe what you smell. Which smells do you notice straight away, and which do you only become aware of after some time? What sort of judgments do you make?
Smell the different types of animal feed in a barn. Describe the smells and also describe your first impression of them (tasty, disgusting, etc.). You can do this exercise with other objects, too, such as plants, animals, foods, textiles, detergents, and so on.

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100+ Free Sniffing & Dog Photos - Pixabay

The Six Basic Exercises for Esoteric Development

Rudolf Steiner gave six exercises that are fundamental to his meditative work.

No. 1 – The Control of Thought
The first exercise has to do with the control of thinking. It is designed to keep our minds from wandering, to focus on them, in order to strengthen our meditative work. There are several versions of this exercise.

Here is one version:
Select a simple object – a pin, a button, a pencil. Try to think about it exclusively for five minutes. You may think about the way the object is manufactured, how it is used, what its history is. Try to be logical and realistic in your thinking. This exercise is best if practiced faithfully every day. You may use the same object every day or a new object each day, as you choose.

No. 2 – The Control of Will
Choose a simple action to perform each day at a time you select. It should be something you do not ordinarily do; it can even be a little odd. Then make it a duty to perform this action at that time each day. Rudolf Steiner gives the example of watering a flower each day at a certain time. As you progress, additional tasks can be added at other times.

This exercise is as hard as it is simple and takes a very strong intention to complete. To start you might think of it as you think of a dentist’s appointment – you do not want to be late. It can be helpful to mark your success or failure on the calendar each day. If you completely forget at the time but remember later, do it then and try to do better the next day.

No. 3 – Equanimity
The third exercise is the development of the balance between joy and sorrow, pleasure and pain, the heights of pleasure, and the depths of despair. Strive for a balanced mood. An attempt should be made not to become immoderately angry or annoyed, not to become anxious or fearful, not to become disconcerted, nor to be overcome by joy or sorrow. Rather should your natural feelings be permitted to be quietly felt. Try to maintain your composure. This leads to inner tranquillity and purer feelings of the soul.

No. 4
This exercise is the development of a positive attitude to life. Attempt to seek for the good, praiseworthy, and beautiful in all beings, all experiences, and all things. Soon you will begin to notice the hidden good and beauty that lies concealed in all things. This is connected with learning not to criticize everything. You can ask how something came to be or to act the way it is. One way to overcome the tendency to criticize is to learn to ‘characterize’ instead.

No. 5
For this exercise, make the effort to confront every new experience with complete open-mindedness. The habit of saying, “I never heard that” or “I never saw that before” should be overcome. The possibility of something completely new coming into the world must be left open, even if it contradicts all your previous knowledge and experience.

No. 6
If you have been trying the earlier exercises of thinking, will, equilibrium, positivity, and tolerance, you are now ready to try them together with two or three at a time, in varying combinations until they become natural and harmonious.

For more information see Guidance in Esoteric Training, by Rudolf Steiner:

https://wn.rsarchive.org/Lectures/GA245/English/GuidEsot.index.html

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Sense of Balance

Steiner’s twelve senses can be grouped into three categories. He distinguished senses which relate to the perception of:
• your body: the senses of touch, of life, of movement, of balance
• the external world: smell, taste, sight, temperature
• the immaterial, spiritual world: hearing, speech, thought, ego

Will, feeling, thought
• The first four senses, the lowest, are called physical senses, or senses of the will because they are used to perceive one’s own body.
• The middle four senses are the senses of feeling. Observations made with these senses arouse feelings. These senses are also reflected in our language: a tastefully furnished house, a sourpuss, hard to swallow, heart-warming, cold thought.
• The last four senses, the highest, focus particularly on the other. These are the spiritual or knowledge senses and they are used in the observation of other people.

We use our sense of balance to orient ourselves in the world. Observations
made with this sense let you know what is up and down, left and right, in
front and behind, above and below. The sense of balance perceives the
smallest changes in your vertical position.
Your body has a dynamic equilibrium. You maintain your balance by making
very small adjustments in muscle tension in muscles all over your body.
Every time you stand up you have to rediscover your balance, by using this
sense.
Your organ of balance is not the only organ that you use to maintain your balance. Your eyes are at least as important to orient yourself in your surroundings. Your eyes see vertical and horizontal objects
which confirm the information given by your organ of balance. Try walking in a room where everything is at odd angles. Your balance could be so distorted, that the surface of the water in a bucket (which is in fact always horizontal) would appear to be sloping downhill.
The organ of balance is situated in the petrosal bone and is made up of three semi-circular canals which are perpendicular to each other, and the sacculus and utriculus. The three semi-circular canals are filled with a fluid that moves with every movement of your head, thus registering changes in direction.
Because they are at right angles to each other, they can perceive movement in every direction. The sacculus and utriculus perceive the linear position and linear displacement. In the sacculus, a gel-like substance with a calcule made of calcium-carbonate crystals rests on a horizontal layer of sensory cells.
During vertical acceleration or deceleration, such as in a lift, the sensory cells detect a change in pressure from the calcule. At constant speed, the pressure on the sensory cells is constant, so you do not notice it.
The utriculus also has a calcule, but it is situated against a vertical layer of sensory cells. These cells detect changes in horizontal acceleration, such as when a car accelerates or pulls over. Again, constant speed is not detected.

Together, the three-dimensional planes in the organ of balance cover
all the degrees of movement in the joints. See figure 4: the ankle,
knee, elbows, shoulder and jaws are in the same plane as the organ of
balance.
When you observe other objects, you are using your organ of balance
in different ways. First, to determine the position of the object in the
surroundings, taking the horizon as your orientation. Secondly, to
observe whether something is standing straight up, or leaning, and
whether something is actually horizontal or only seems to be. You can
detect how far something is out of true. Finally, using your organ of
balance you can detect whether something is out of proportion, e.g.
whether the length is in proportion with height.

Exercises
Spin someone around a few times while holding him, and observe his eye movements. Keep holding him after you stop spinning him. What is his balance like after having been spun around? What observations can you make, and what observations did the subject make during and after spinning?
How does he perceive his surroundings?

Do this exercise again with another subject, but this time let the subject go after spinning. What observations can you make now?

Blindfold yourself and then try to balance while standing on one leg. Then do it without a blindfold. What is the difference?
the organ of balance: maxillary joint, shoulder joint, elbow joint, hip joint, wrist joint, knee joint, ankle joint & ear

Find some trees whose trunks rise almost straight up, but not quite. Observe these trees, and determine what would be the ideal position or angle of the tree-trunk. Repeat this exercise with observations of branches. An excellent tree for this exercise is a mature beech whose branches bend down low to the ground. Record the length, height, and girth of various mammals. How do these measurements relate to each other? Can you make any statements about the harmony of these proportions?

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Sense of Movement

Steiner’s twelve senses can be grouped into three categories. He distinguished senses which relate to the perception of:
• your body: the senses of touch, of life, of movement, of balance
• the external world: smell, taste, sight, temperature
• the immaterial, spiritual world: hearing, speech, thought, ego

Will, feeling, thought
• The first four senses, the lowest, are called physical senses, or senses of the will because they are used to perceive one’s own body.
• The middle four senses are the senses of feeling. Observations made with these senses arouse feelings. These senses are also reflected in our language: a tastefully furnished house, a sourpuss, hard to swallow, heart-warming, cold thought.
• The last four senses, the highest, focus particularly on the other. These are the spiritual or knowledge senses and they are used in the observation of other people.

Sense of Movement or Muscle Sense
The previous two senses observed the body’s boundaries, the body’s internal
state and the space it takes up. The sense of movement, or of muscles,
enables you to perceive your body’s movements and posture. Your body –
limbs, eyes, mouth, tongue, forehead, chest – is never still. All these
movements are perceived, and very accurately, too. You can perceive a
0.038-degree turn of the elbow. Not only do you perceive your movements, but you are also aware of the exact position of your limbs and all the other
moving parts of your body. At any given moment, you know exactly where
your arms and feet are. This is essential information; if you are going to execute a new movement, you have to know where the movement is to begin. You don’t even have to think about this, the sense of movement is always present. The muscle sense is situated in spindle-shaped receptors in the muscles, which measure the degree of tension in the muscle fibres (figure 2) There are similar receptors in the tendons. The bending and
stretching of the limbs are perceived by receptors in the joint tendons and in the surrounding tissue.

Your sense of movement is primarily focused on perceiving your own body, but you often also use it to observe things around you. In observing moving objects, your sense of movement works together with your sense of sight, so that you can see the type of movement taking place and estimate the speed of the moving object. In order to determine the object’s shape, your eyes follow the outline of the object and shift to and from details that attract your attention. Painters use this roving habit of eyes to guide you
through their painting along a chosen course. The movements and shapes are observed by the movement sense in the eye muscles, but the eye itself only observes the colours. You can also perceive the movement of a branch in a tree with your muscle sense, by imitating the movement with your arms. You could also imagine the movement, and imagine how your eyes or arms
would likewise move. This is called sensorial fantasy or muscular imagery, and you can apply it whenever you want to observe and imitate shapes and movements. Think about: the gait of a horse, how a cow or a
pig lies down, the motions of leaves, the arrangement of branches in different trees, and so on.
Movement and feeling are connected. This is evident in our body language: the welcome indicated by open arms, the dismissal expressed by a throw-away wave of the hand, and so on.

Exercises

• Perception of precise movements

Take a piece of paper and a pencil. Close your eyes, or ask someone to blindfold you. Draw a house or a three-master. The first time, draw it as you would normally draw, occasionally lifting your pencil off the paper. Then draw it again, but keep the pencil on the paper all the time. You could also do
this exercise on a blackboard, so that others can observe you as you draw.

• Perception of larger movements

Draw a straight line on the pavement with chalk and then draw a circle about ten metres on. Connect the two with an undulating line. Your drawing should roughly resemble the figure below. One person stands behind the start line and then walks along the undulating course and places a small object in the circle. The subject then goes back to the start line and repeats the exercise
blindfold. You could vary this exercise so that the subject first observes the course from the start line, and then walks it blindfold and places an object in the circle.

• Observing position and movement

Ask someone to blindfold you and to put your arm in a certain position. Describe the exact position of your arm, which muscles are activated and which are not. Then let someone change the position of your arm just slightly. Again, describe the position of your arm and the muscles used, and
describe the changes that you perceive in your arm. Split into two groups. Form rows, facing each other, and put your hands flat against the hands of
the person opposite you. Make circles and other movements with your hands, varying the pressure on the other’s hands. Describe what you feel: the pressure, tension, relaxation and movements.

• Imitation

Describe the motion of a moving organism, either human or animal. What is the motion like, which parts of the organism are moving, could you imitate the movement?
Stand in front of a large object and observe it while someone else observes your eyes. Ask this person to describe your eye movements.

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Sense of Life

Steiner’s twelve senses can be grouped into three categories. He distinguished senses which relate to the perception of:
• your body: the senses of touch, of life, of movement, of balance
• the external world: smell, taste, sight, temperature
• the immaterial, spiritual world: hearing, speech, thought, ego

Will, feeling, thought
• The first four senses, the lowest, are called physical senses, or senses of the will because they are used to perceive one’s own body.
• The middle four senses are the senses of feeling. Observations made with these senses arouse feelings. These senses are also reflected in our language: a tastefully furnished house, a sourpuss, hard to swallow, heart-warming, cold thought.
• The last four senses, the highest, focus particularly on the other. These are the spiritual or knowledge senses and they are used in the observation of other people.

Sense of Life

The sense of life is the internal sense of your organs and internal life processes. Your life sense tells you that you are full, that you have
indigestion, or that you have to go to the toilet. You do not sense anything
as long as your life processes are all following their normal, harmonious
course. You do not register the life sense until one of the life processes is
disturbed, or when you are ill. Other examples of observations made by your
life sense are stomach-ache, congested nose, or sinusitis. You do not perceive
your organs or life sense unless something is wrong.
Pain is a serious disturbance that is also perceived with the life sense. Your life sense tells you that you have cut your finger, that a muscle hurts or that you bumped your knee on the table leg. Generally, your life sense gives you information about your physical situation, your health, vitality, illness, or pain. The life sense uses the vegetative nervous system, which has connections with all the internal organs. Another type of observation that the life sense can make is the perception of your body as having substance. Your life sense makes you perceive yourself as a physical, material body. If you only had a
sense of touch, you would only be able to feel your body’s boundary, so that your body would feel like an empty shell. Normally speaking, you are not consciously aware of your body or your organs. Your attention is not
drawn inward, and this enables you to focus on the world around you. When you are sick or in considerable pain, you are less attentive to your surroundings. The following anecdote illustrates what might happen if your sense of life isn’t functioning properly. One afternoon, a couple went to visit friends and left their son at home. When they came home, they could
smell scorched flesh and saw their son playing with a candle. He was holding his fingers in the candle’s flame and watching them turning black. He did not feel any pain to warn him that what he was doing was dangerous. This insensitivity is a symptom of leprosy. People with leprosy do not feel pain, so they do not notice when they get cuts or infections, and subsequently do not treat them. The wounds become infected and the infection can penetrate deeply into the body and result in disfigurement. Pain (and your life sense) is a sensory warning system. If you didn’t get a message that your stomach was
full, you would not know when to stop eating. You would not go to the toilet if you couldn’t tell your bladder was full. Pain protects you from further injury. A stab of pain warns you that you are cutting your finger and should stop. If this sense did not function, many safety measures would need to be taken in
order to prevent injury and accidents. Your life sense is directed at the perception of your body; you perceive your life processes with your life
sense. But you can also use your life sense to make external observations, by using it in combination with other senses and empathizing. With practice, you can observe:
• health, vitality, and illness in other people and organisms.
• pain suffered by another person or animal. You can feel the other’s pain when you see something happen because you have felt that pain before yourself. You can feel this pain directly, it doesn’t take much imagination. You must beware, though, of transferring human feelings to plants or animals.
• the space that an object occupies in its surroundings. Is the space it takes up satisfactory, is it filled harmoniously or not?

Exercises
Inner observations using the life sense. Perceive the state of one of your organs (stomach, intestines, lungs, heart). Then drink a few glasses
of water or jog around the block, and repeat the observation. Have you ever felt an organ? For example, your lungs, heart, bladder, spleen, liver, muscles. What did you observe, in which circumstances did you feel the organ?
External observations using the life sense. Health, vitality. Observe the vitality of a tree. How can you determine its vitality: what part does your life sense play? Make an observation of the health of an animal, e.g. a cow. How can you determine its health, what part does your life sense play?
Pain: observe the pain of another person or animal. What do you experience, where do you experience it, what feelings go through you?
Space: observe the space that is filled by an organism (plant, tree, or animal). Is the space filled harmoniously or not?

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