Yoga Means

Yoga means that now there is no hope, now there is no future, now there is are no desires. One is ready to know what is. One is not interested in what can be, what should be, what ought to be. One is not interested! One is interested only in that which is because only the real can free you, only the reality can become liberation.

Total despair is needed. That despair is called dukkha by Buddha. And if you are really in misery, don’t hope, because your hope will only prolong the misery. Your hope is a drug. It can help you to reach death only nowhere else. All your hopes can lead you only to death.

Become totally hopeless, no future, no hope. Difficult. Needs courage to face the real. But such a moment comes to everyone some time or another. A moment comes to every human being when he feels total hopelessness. Absolute meaninglessness happens to him. When he becomes aware that whatsoever he is doing is useless, wheresoever he is going, he is going nowhere, all his life is meaningless, suddenly hopes drop, future drops, and for the time you are face to face with the reality… When you are not moving into the future, not moving toward the past then you start moving within yourself, because your being is is here and now. You are present here and now. You can enter this reality.

Bhagwan S. Rajneesh his comments on the Yogasutras

On His Final Night of Enlighten’ment

On the night of his final enlightenment, even the Buddha had to call on the power of the Earth goddess, the divine Shakti, for help with the forces of Mara/s, the dark powers of delusion. Buddha touched the ground where he sat. “This Earth,” he said, “is my witness.” This statement could be taken further: this Earth is my family member, my sister, myself. 

Demonic Forces: The Four Maras

  • To make one ecstatic (dga’-byed)
  • To make one crave (sred-byed)
  • To make one stupefied (rmongs-byed), which perhaps suggests making one spaced out or senile
  • To make one thin, emaciated and dried out (skem-byed), which, in this context, could mean worn out, hungry, and thirsty, so that one gives up meditation. In other contexts, perhaps it is the work of Mara that we become dried out and have no moisture of compassion.
  • To make one dead (‘chi-byed), which, in this context, could perhaps make Shiva worry that he will die while meditating, so being afraid of that, he would get up.

https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/lam-rim/samsara-nirvana/demonic-forces-the-four-maras