Reconsidering YOUR Controlled Beliefs about YOUR Reality

 

 

 

 

 

 

In order to keep us obedient and meek and weak, the predators engaged themselves in a stupendous maneuver – stupendous, of course, from the point of view of a fighting strategist. A horrendous maneuver from the point of view of those who suffer it. They gave us their mind!Through the mind, which, after all, is their mind, the predators inject into the lives of human beings whatever is convenient for them.” Don Juan Matus

 

Have a strategy for his life. If you do not, you will end up a mere reflection of society, with your original self all but buried. Don Juan Matus

Can freedom come from control? The very nature of bondage is control, and yet most of us seek freedom through greater and greater control in our lives. Is there a link between psychological suffering and the pervasive need to feel that we are in control? History repeats itself, every single day. When we watch ourselves—when we observe our thoughts and actions on a daily basis—the degree to which we live according to certain patterns becomes glaringly obvious. Most of us take these patterns for granted, or are not even conscious of them, and so we’re not aware of the power they have in our lives. Going a step further, what we understand to be free will and personal agency are deeply governed by these patterns—which are essentially expressions of our conditioning—to the point that we might question the validity of these notions as they are commonly understood. At first, this understanding can be disconcerting; it can be scary to think that we are not really in control of our own lives, but this realization also has the power to release us from a great deal of confusion and suffering. Indeed, the notion of control itself may one of the most deeply embedded illusions in the human mind, and sages throughout history have pointed this out to help us let go of something that causes an immense amount of psychological suffering. This awareness can be freeing, having the power to lead us to a transformative understanding of ourselves. The suffering that arises from our patterns and conditioning is closely tied to misunderstanding. Maya, The Great Illusion (as the term is often described based on Vedic texts), can also be understood as a web of deeply rooted misunderstandings about ourselves and the nature of reality. Why is it that we are so compelled to be in control? What understandings—or misunderstandings—lead us to believe that control is so absolutely imperative to every aspect of our lives? Is it possible that fear and insecurity are behind most expressions of control? There are many answers to these questions, however we might benefit more by not dwelling merely on questions and answers, but rather by passively observing the patterns we live by—which include our judgments and beliefs—and seeing for ourselves the truth behind these patterns and what role they are playing in our own lives. In watching our patterns and gradually (or suddenly) realizing the freedom that lies in letting go of rigid ownership of every thought and action that arises, the possibility of a different way of being arises. We can become aware of certain judgments and beliefs, and instead of automatically agreeing with them or acting on them, we can step back and see what happens if we just let them pass. We can introduce a spaciousness into our awareness that lets us relate to thoughts in intelligent and creative ways, as opposed to being blindly led around by them. With greater awareness comes greater understanding, and we may become aware of certain core beliefs that underlie many of our thoughts. Many people are plagued by thoughts that come from a central belief that they are not whole, that they are not good enough as they are. They may default to thinking they have done something wrong, even when they have actually acted appropriately or even done something good from a place of kindness, creativity or authenticity. Bringing light to such patterns and the beliefs that perpetuate them, we can begin to question their validity and loosen their grip on us. By seeing how we’re acting out patterns and that we’re not unique in this sense, we can have a bit more compassion for ourselves when we make mistakes, as well as for others when they make their own mistakes. We still need to claim responsibility for our actions, but we can also see them from a different angle that makes it possible for us to learn from them and ultimately transform ourselves. Though we think we are in control, this illusion actually binds us to the control of our patterns, of our conditioning, with all their divisive and painful judgments and beliefs. And so, to control is to be controlled. Seeing this as a fact, we might pause and begin to reassess what’s actually occurring in our own lives, what’s driving our thoughts and actions. We can hopefully begin to relax a bit more as we nurture inner peace from a place of awareness, and find some more intelligent and creative approaches to living and relating to each other. JR “Is there in daily existence a way of living in which every form of psychological control ceases to exist?—because control means effort, it means division between the controller and the controlled; I am angry, I must control my anger; I smoke, I must not smoke and I must resist smoking. We are saying there is something totally different and this may be misunderstood and may be rejected altogether because it is very common to say that all life is control—if you do not control you will become permissive, nonsensical, without meaning, therefore you must control. Religions, philosophies, teachers, your family, your mother, they all encourage you to control. We have never asked: Who is the controller?” J. Krishnamurti,

Don’t waste your energy worrying about things. Everyone is locked in a vicious cycle. We all have our magic cure which we trust will cure everything, and resolve every one of our problems. At the moment, perhaps we can’t afford it, but we have great hopes that we eventually will be able to. Don Juan Matus

“What we have become accustomed to witnessing is a social illusion that takes precedence due to the fact that the process is so intrusive that it becomes difficult to bear witness to the unobtrusive, which is so subtle in comparison.” Lujan Matus

We are not naturally petty and contradictory. Our pettiness and contradictions are, rather, the result of a transcendental conflict that afflicts every one of us, but of which only sorcerers are painfully and hopelessly aware: the conflict of our two minds! One is our true mind, the product of all our life experiences, the one that rarely speaks because it has been defeated and relegated to obscurity. The other, the mind we use daily for everything we do, is a foreign installation. Don Juan Matus

In order to get by, we make invisible agreements with others – spouse, children, society, God – but the most important agreements we make, are with ourselves. Some of them benefit us, but many others make us suffer. We hang onto them because we believe we would be something less without them. According to Toltec wisdom, most people’s problems stem from not being able to forgive themselves that they are not perfect, yet it is other people’s rules that they are trying to measure up to – not their own. Miguel Ruiz

“Awareness” is energy and “energy” is constant flux, a luminous vibration that is never stationary, but always moving of its own accord. Don Juan Matus

In Toltec wisdom, the world or ‘reality’ is seen as a collective dream. The word used for this fog of perception is mitote, which is similar to the Hindu word for illusion, maya. This dream is the same as normal dreams, except that its rules and customs of understanding and behaving enable it to seem more real. We are born into a ready-made phantasm which includes language, culture, religion and family, and we agree to go along with it because it is too difficult to resist. This process of ‘the domestication of humans’. Miguel Ruiz

“The constant assertion of belief is an indication of fear.”
― Jiddu Krishnamurti

“NO MAN STEPS INTO THE SAME RIVER TWICE; FOR IT IS NOT THE SAME RIVER, AND HE IS NOT THE SAME MAN.” -HERACLITUS

“You have to live the way you are going to end up.” Lujan Matus

“We can intend not to be our program.” Lujan Matus

“When a not-doing comes upon you, and there is no reflection of yourself to be found, many things can and will be related back to you as knowledge, yet you have no way of knowing how you assimilated that wisdom.” Lujan Matus

Sorcerers’ aspirations are to reach infinity, and to be conscious of it. The task of sorcerers is to face infinity. They plunge into it daily, as a fisherman plunges into the sea. It is such an overwhelming task that sorcerers have to state their names before venturing into it. In this manner, they assert their individuality in front of the infinite. What makes human beings into sorcerers is their capacity to perceive energy directly as it flows in the universe. Human beings are not only capable of seeing energy directly as it flows in the universe, but they actually do see it, although they are not deliberately conscious of seeing it. Don Juan Matus

The THIRD ATTENTION

IN this World-Discomfort-Pain-Desire-Thoughts-Motivation-Dissatisfaction-Cause-Effect-Time- Equals Our Personal Story. 

Don Juan consistently used or referred to the phrase “man of knowledge” but never explained what he meant by it. I asked him about it… “A man of knowledge is one who has followed truthfully the hardships of learning,” he said. “A man who has, without rushing or without faltering, gone as far as he can in unraveling the secrets of power and knowledge.”

“Can anyone be a man of knowledge?”
“No, not anyone.”
“Then what must a man do to become a man of knowledge?”
“He must challenge and defeat his four natural enemies.”
“Will he be a man of knowledge after defeating these four enemies?”
“Yes. A man can call himself a man of knowledge only if he is capable of defeating all four of them.”
“Then, can anybody who defeats these enemies be a man of knowledge?”
“Anybody who defeats them becomes a man of knowledge.”

“But are there any special requirements a man must fulfill before fighting with these enemies?”
“No. Anyone can try to become a man of knowledge; very few men actually succeed, but that is only natural. The enemies a man encounters on the path of learning to become a man of knowledge are truly formidable; most men succumb to them.”
“What kind of enemies are they, don Juan?”

He refused to talk about the enemies. He said it would be a long time before the subject would make any sense to me. I tried to keep the topic alive and asked him if he thought I could become a man of knowledge. He said no man could possibly tell that for sure. But I insisted on knowing if there were any clues he could use to determine whether or not I had a chance of becoming a man of knowledge.

He said it would depend on my battle against the four enemies… whether I could defeat them or would be defeated by them… but it was impossible to foretell the outcome of that fight. I asked him if he could use witchcraft or divination to see the outcome of the battle. He flatly stated that the result of the struggle could not be foreseen by any means, because becoming a man of knowledge was a temporary thing. When I asked him to explain this point, he replied: “To be a man of knowledge has no permanence. One is never a man of knowledge, not really. Rather, one becomes a man of knowledge for a very brief instant, after defeating the four natural enemies.”
“You must tell me, Don Juan, what kind of enemies they are.”
He did not answer. I insisted again, but he dropped the subject and started to talk about something else.

Sunday, April 15th, 1962
As I was getting ready to leave, I decided to ask him once more about the enemies of a man of knowledge. I argued that I could not return for some time, and it would be a good idea to write down what he had to say and then think about it while I was away. He hesitated for a while, but then began to talk.

“When a man starts to learn, he is never clear about his objectives. His purpose is faulty; his intent is vague. He hopes for rewards that will never materialize, for he knows nothing of the hardships of learning. “He slowly begins to learn… bit by bit at first, then in big chunks. And his thoughts soon clash. What he learns is never what he pictured, or imagined, and so he begins to be afraid. Learning is never what one expects. Every step of learning is a new task, and the fear the man is experiencing begins to mount mercilessly, unyieldingly. His purpose becomes a battlefield.

“And thus he has tumbled upon the first of his natural enemies: Fear!

A terrible enemy… treacherous, and difficult to overcome. It remains concealed at every turn of the way, prowling… waiting. And if the man, terrified in its presence, runs away, his enemy will have put an end to his quest.”
“What will happen to the man if he runs away in fear?”
“Nothing happens to him except that he will never learn. He will never become a man of knowledge. He will perhaps be a bully or a harmless, scared man; at any rate, he will be a defeated man. His first enemy will have put an end to his cravings.”
“And what can he do to overcome fear?”
“The answer is very simple. He must not run away. He must defy his fear, and in spite of it he must take the next step in learning, and the next, and the next. He must be fully afraid, and yet he must not stop. That is the rule! And a moment will come when his first enemy retreats. The man begins to feel sure of himself. His intent becomes stronger. Learning is no longer a terrifying task. “When this joyful moment comes, the man can say without hesitation that he has defeated his first natural enemy.”

“Does it happen at once, don Juan, or little by little?”
“It happens little by little, and yet the fear is vanquished suddenly and fast.”
“But won’t the man be afraid again if something new happens to him?”
“No. Once a man has vanquished fear, he is free from it for the rest of his life because, instead of fear, he has acquired clarity… a clarity of mind which erases fear. By then a man knows his desires; he knows how to satisfy those desires. He can anticipate the new steps of learning, and a sharp clarity surrounds everything. The man feels that nothing is concealed.

“And thus he has encountered his second enemy: Clarity!

That clarity of mind, which is so hard to obtain, dispels fear, but also blinds. “It forces the man never to doubt himself. It gives him the assurance he can do anything he pleases, for he sees clearly into everything. And he is courageous because he is clear, and he stops at nothing because he is clear. But all that is a mistake; it is like something incomplete. If the man yields to this make-believe power, he has succumbed to his second enemy and will fumble with learning. He will rush when he should be patient, or he will be patient when he should rush. And he will fumble with learning until he winds up incapable of learning anything more.” 

“What becomes of a man who is defeated in that way, Don Juan? Does he die as a result?”
“No, he doesn’t die. His second enemy has just stopped him cold from trying to become a man of knowledge; instead, the man may turn into a buoyant warrior, or a clown. Yet the clarity for which he has paid so dearly will never change to darkness and fear again. He will be clear as long as he lives, but he will no longer learn, or yearn for, anything.”

“But what does he have to do to avoid being defeated?”
“He must do what he did with fear: he must defy his clarity and use it only to see, and wait patiently and measure carefully before taking new steps; he must think, above all, that his clarity is almost a mistake. And a moment will come when he will understand that his clarity was only a point before his eyes. And thus he will have overcome his second enemy, and will arrive at a position where nothing can harm him any more. This will not be a mistake. It will not be only a point before his eyes. It will be true power. “He will know at this point that the power he has been pursuing for so long is finally his. He can do with it whatever he pleases. His ally is at his command. His wish is the rule. He sees all that is around him.

But he has also come across his third enemy: Power!

“Power is the strongest of all enemies. And naturally the easiest thing to do is to give in; after all, the man is truly invincible. He commands; he begins by taking calculated risks, and ends in making rules, because he is a master. “A man at this stage hardly notices his third enemy closing in on him. And suddenly, without knowing, he will certainly have lost the battle. His enemy will have turned him into a cruel, capricious man.”

“Will he lose his power?”
“No, he will never lose his clarity or his power.”
“What then will distinguish him from a man of knowledge?”
“A man who is defeated by power dies without really knowing how to handle it. Power is only a burden upon his fate. Such a man has no command over himself, and cannot tell when or how to use his power.”
“Is the defeat by any of these enemies a final defeat?”
“Of course it is final. Once one of these enemies overpowers a man there is nothing he can do.”
“Is it possible, for instance, that the man who is defeated by power may see his error and mend his ways?”
“No. Once a man gives in he is through.”

“But what if he is temporarily blinded by power, and then refuses it?”
“That means his battle is still on. That means he is still trying to become a man of knowledge. A man is defeated only when he no longer tries, and abandons himself.”
“But then, don Juan, it is possible that a man may abandon himself to fear for years, but finally conquer it?”
“No, that is not true. If he gives in to fear he will never conquer it, because he will shy away from learning and never try again. But if he tries to learn for years in the midst of his fear, he will eventually conquer it because he will never have really abandoned himself to it.”

“How can he defeat his third enemy, don Juan?”
“He has to defy it, deliberately. He has to come to realize the power he has seemingly conquered is in reality never his. He must keep himself in line at all times, handling carefully and faithfully all that he has learned. If he can see that clarity and power, without his control over himself, are worse than mistakes, he will reach a point where everything is held in check. He will know then when and how to use his power. And thus he will have defeated his third enemy.

“The man will be, by then, at the end of his journey of learning… and almost without warning he will come upon the last of his enemies: Old age!

This enemy is the cruelest of all, the one he won’t be able to defeat completely, but only fight away. “This is the time when a man has no more fears, no more impatient clarity of mind… a time when all his power is in check, but also the time when he has an unyielding desire to rest. If he gives in totally to his desire to lie down and forget, if he soothes himself in tiredness, he will have lost his last round, and his enemy will cut him down into a feeble old creature. His desire to retreat will overrule all his clarity, his power, and his knowledge.

“But if the man sloughs off his tiredness, and lives his fate through, he can then be called a man of knowledge, if only for the brief moment when he succeeds in fighting off his last, invincible enemy. That moment of clarity, power, and knowledge is enough.”

The Third Attention Keys

The element of Air, Gas, Mind or Intellect, Whole Brain Function, Loss of Cohesiveness, Molecular, Ether, Shape Shifting, Re-Arranging Your Pieces, Ego Death, Death Experience,  Still Distinctions but Structure of Self is Gone, Instantaneous, De-construct or Re-construct.

 

The Words of Don Juan Matus

https://www.tekgnostics.com/JUAN.HTM

https://medium.com/journal-of-international-psychogeography/castaneda-and-the-second-attention-9a7a35e26e67

Bridgette Lyn was trained and has developed her own Shamanic Blow that does very similar things to Don Juan Matus’s Blow. The hands-on mechanical part is different. Essential for moving out of the first attention and overcoming the stuck point in the energy body. Assemble point shifting to shift focus and get point of focus connecting to other fumes/strands of consciousness. This kind of assemblage point movement, shamanic blow, a reboot can arrest the disease, cure addictions in the First Attention and over time help people to access a higher state of consciousness that connects to where ever they want there focus in their fumes/strands to be. This is done in complete and total sobriety. Bridgette does not recommend using dreaming medicines to shift consciousness for the long term, but proper reboots, moving of the assemblage points, shamanic work, and practices for the long term and assurance of bypassing the First Attention.

So you can be in the world but not of it.

Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff is a lifetime practitioner of shamanic arts and comes from the bloodlines of shamanic people. She works with people by appointment and in person. See fees for price structures and testimonial page.

The FIRST ATTENTION

The SECOND ATTENTION

They gave US their MIND!

The AIM in Stalking..

You will defend the MATRIX with Your Last Breath, I know I have SEEN It

 

The Mind devises Systems Confining Everything in Them

None can reach heaven who has not passed through hell.”
– Sri Aurobindo

It is clear that the Mind has not been able to change human nature radically. You can go on changing human institutions infinitely and yet the imperfection will break through all your institutions.” 

It must be another power that can not only resist but overcome that downward pull. Even if our ideas reached life in their pure form, they would still be incapable of creating anything other than a military order—or perhaps a holy, comfortable, religious order, but an order all the same, because the Mind can only devise systems and seek to confine everything in them. The reason of man struggling with life becomes either an empiric or a doctrinaire. 

It seizes upon a bit of truth, one drop of divine illumination, and makes it a universal law; it constantly confuses unity with uniformity.

Even when it is capable of understanding the need for diversity, it is practically incapable of implementing it, because it only knows how to deal with what is invariable and finite, while the world is teeming with an infinite variety. Ideas themselves are partial and insufficient: not only have they a very partial triumph but if their success were complete, it would still disappoint, because they are not the whole truth of life and therefore cannot securely govern and perfect life. Life escapes from the formulas and systems which our reason labors to impose on it; it proclaims itself too complex, too full of infinite potentialities to be tyrannized over by the arbitrary intellect of man.

The root of the difficulty is this that at the very basis of all our life and existence, internal and external, there is something on which the intellect can never lay a controlling hand, the Absolute, the Infinite.

Behind everything in life, there is an Absolute, which that thing is seeking after in its own way; everything finite is striving to express an infinite which it feels to be its real truth. Moreover, it is not only each class, each type, each tendency in Nature that is thus impelled to strive after its own variation.
Thus there is not only an Absolute, an Infinite in itself which governs its own expression in many forms and tendencies, but there is also a principle of infinite potentiality and variation quite baffling to the reasoning intelligence; for the reason deals successfully only with the settled and the finite. In man, this difficulty reaches its acme. For not only is mankind unlimited in potentiality, not only is each of its powers and tendencies seeking after its own absolute in its own way and therefore naturally restless under any rigid control by the reason; but in each man their degrees, methods, combinations vary, each man belongs not only to the common humanity but to the Infinite in himself
and is therefore unique.

It is because this is the reality of our existence that the intellectual reason and the intelligent will cannot deal with life as its sovereign.”

– Sri Aurobindo