Yoga Means

Yoga means that now there is no hope, now there is no future, now there is are no desires. One is ready to know what is. One is not interested in what can be, what should be, what ought to be. One is not interested! One is interested only in that which is because only the real can free you, only the reality can become liberation.

Total despair is needed. That despair is called dukkha by Buddha. And if you are really in misery, don’t hope, because your hope will only prolong the misery. Your hope is a drug. It can help you to reach death only nowhere else. All your hopes can lead you only to death.

Become totally hopeless, no future, no hope. Difficult. Needs courage to face the real. But such a moment comes to everyone some time or another. A moment comes to every human being when he feels total hopelessness. Absolute meaninglessness happens to him. When he becomes aware that whatsoever he is doing is useless, wheresoever he is going, he is going nowhere, all his life is meaningless, suddenly hopes drop, future drops, and for the time you are face to face with the reality… When you are not moving into the future, not moving toward the past then you start moving within yourself, because your being is is here and now. You are present here and now. You can enter this reality.

Bhagwan S. Rajneesh his comments on the Yogasutras

In Addition To…

End Suffering

In addition to the mind, body, and personality, yoga teaches that the true home of the soul is also beyond time and space, in the external now of consciousness. When we live disconnected from the vast roots of the Self, We suffer. Self is capitalized here because it refers to the divine, awake, free self. Giving the yogic view of our predicament, it’s not surprising that we are often so estranged, that we feel unreal, that we feel disconnected from our center. That is precisely our condition.

The classical “scriptures” identify five “afflictions” or kleshas, five conditioned beliefs and behaviors that keep us bound to ” gross apparent reality.”¬†They are:

Ignorance, I-ness, Attraction, Aversion, Clinging to life, and fear of death.

Ignorance is the ground from which all other afflictions spring. Out of Ignorance arises I-ness the belief in and clinging to a separate, solid, “small s” self. Out of the I-ness arise attraction and aversion, our complete identification with our likes and dislikes. And out of this inevitably arises clinging to life and fear of death, a deluded and desperate desire for life to be small, neat, permanent, and solid rather than vast, incomprehensible, impermanent, and discontinuous as it really is.

In addition to the five afflictions, the scriptures also identify four erroneous beliefs that sustain the delusion of the kleshas. These are:

The belief in the permanence of objects, The belief in the ultimate reality of the body, The belief that our state of suffering IS REALLY HAPPINESS, and The belief that our bodies, minds, and feelings are our true selves.